Replication of the association of common rs9939609 variant of FTO with increased BMI in an Australian adult twin population but no evidence for gene by environment (G × E) interaction

Cornes, B., Lind, P. A., Medland, S. E., Montgomery, G. W ., Nyholt, D. R. and Martin, N. G . (2009) Replication of the association of common rs9939609 variant of FTO with increased BMI in an Australian adult twin population but no evidence for gene by environment (G × E) interaction. International Journal of Obesity, 33 1: 75-79. doi:10.1038/ijo.2008.223


Author Cornes, B.
Lind, P. A.
Medland, S. E.
Montgomery, G. W .
Nyholt, D. R.
Martin, N. G .
Title Replication of the association of common rs9939609 variant of FTO with increased BMI in an Australian adult twin population but no evidence for gene by environment (G × E) interaction
Formatted title
Replication of the association of common rs9939609 variant of FTO with increased BMI in an Australian adult twin population but no evidence for gene by environment (G × E) interaction
Journal name International Journal of Obesity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Publication date 2009
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2008.223
Volume 33
Issue 1
Start page 75
End page 79
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
Abstract Objective: To further investigate a common variant (rs9939609) in the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), which recent genome-wide association studies have shown to be associated with body mass index (BMI) and obesity. Design: We examined the effect of this FTO variant on BMI in 3353 Australian adult male and female twins. Results: The minor A allele of rs9939609 was associated with an increased BMI (P=0.0007). Each additional copy of the A allele was associated with a mean BMI increase of 1.04 kg/m2 (3.71 kg). Using variance components decomposition, we estimate that this single-nucleotide polymorphism accounts for 3% of the genetic variance in BMI in our sample (2% of the total variance). By comparing intrapair variances of monozygotic twins of different genotypes we were able to perform a direct test of gene by environment (G E) interaction in both sexes and gene by parity (G P) interaction in women, but no evidence was found for either. Conclusions: In addition to supporting earlier findings that the rs9939609 variant in the FTO gene is associated with an increased BMI, our results indicate that the associated genetic effect does not interact with environment or parity.
Keyword Body mass index
SNP rs9939609
Fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO)
Gene by environment interaction
Parity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Jun 2009, 14:17:23 EST by Siona Saplos on behalf of School of Medicine