Associations of gestational weight gain with offspring body mass index and blood pressure at 21 years of age: Evidence from a birth cohort study

Mamun, Abdullah A., O'Callaghan, Michael, Callaway, Leonie, Williams, Gail, Najman, Jake and Lawlor, Debbie A. (2009) Associations of gestational weight gain with offspring body mass index and blood pressure at 21 years of age: Evidence from a birth cohort study. Circulation, 119 13: 1720-1727. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.813436


Author Mamun, Abdullah A.
O'Callaghan, Michael
Callaway, Leonie
Williams, Gail
Najman, Jake
Lawlor, Debbie A.
Title Associations of gestational weight gain with offspring body mass index and blood pressure at 21 years of age: Evidence from a birth cohort study
Journal name Circulation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0009-7322
1524-4539
Publication date 2009-04
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.813436
Volume 119
Issue 13
Start page 1720
End page 1727
Total pages 8
Editor Joseph Loscalzo
Place of publication Baltimore, MD, U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins for the American Heart Association
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
C1
9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health)
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Formatted abstract
Background-: Maternal weight gain in pregnancy is positively associated with offspring body mass index (BMI) and obesity risk in childhood, but whether this increased risk extends into adulthood or results in increases in other cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated blood pressure (BP) is unclear.

Methods and Results-: We used a population-based birth cohort of 2432 individuals (50% male) born in Brisbane, Australia, between 1981 and 1983 to prospectively examine the association between maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) and offspring BMI and BP at 21 years. On average, each mother gained 14.8 kg (SD, 5.1 kg) during her pregnancy. At 21 years of age, offspring mean BMI, systolic BP, and diastolic BP were 24.2 kg/m2 (SD, 4.9 kg/m2), 116.4 mm Hg (SD, 14.5 mm Hg), and 67.7 mm Hg (SD, 8.5 mm Hg), respectively. Offspring BMI was on average 0.3 kg/m2 (95% confidence interval, 0.1 to 0.4 kg/m2) higher for each 0.1-kg/wk greater GWG after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Systolic BP also was greater (0.2 mm Hg per 0.1 kg; 95% confidence interval, -0.2 to 0.6) in offspring whose mothers had higher GWG. Although this association was not statistically significant, it was consistent in magnitude with the association of maternal GWG with offspring BMI and of offspring BMI with BP.

Conclusions-: Our findings show that greater GWG is associated with greater offspring BMI into early adulthood and that this may translate into higher systolic BP in offspring. Further large studies are required to confirm an effect of GWG on a range of offspring cardiovascular risk factors.

(C) 2009 American Heart Association, Inc.
Keyword Blood Pressure Changes
Cardiovascular diseases
epidemiology
obesity
pregnancy
young adult
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Thu, 21 May 2009, 16:11:46 EST by Jeann Wong on behalf of School of Public Health