Re-employing the literary: the use of the literary in city identity formation in Brisbane

Glover, Stuart (2006). Re-employing the literary: the use of the literary in city identity formation in Brisbane. In: Johan Fornäs, ESF-LiU Conference. Cities and Media: Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World. ESF-LiU Conference : Cities and Media Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World, Vadstena, Sweden, (195-198). 25-29 October 2006.


Author Glover, Stuart
Title of paper Re-employing the literary: the use of the literary in city identity formation in Brisbane
Formatted title
Re-employing the literary: the use of the literary in city identity formation in Brisbane
Conference name ESF-LiU Conference : Cities and Media Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World
Conference location Vadstena, Sweden
Conference dates 25-29 October 2006
Convener European Science Foundation
Proceedings title ESF-LiU Conference. Cities and Media: Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World
Place of Publication Sweden
Publisher Linköping University Electronic Press, Linköpings universitet
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 1650-3686
1650-3740
Editor Johan Fornäs
Volume 20
Issue 27
Start page 195
End page 198
Total pages 4
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The Downtown Brisbane and Experience Brisbane tourism campaigns of 2001 through 2003 sought to brand the city of Brisbane internally and, to a lessor extent, externally using the literary, particularly the identity and work of local novelist Nick Earls. While the cultural identity of some early modern cities, especially London1, are contiguous with their literary heritage or a literary identity, the usefulness of literary components (such as authorial identities, literary events, and literary narratives connected to place) is underemphasized in accounts of contemporary cultural policy-making2.

Of interest then, is the case of Brisbane’s use of Nick Earls in its branding campaigns (and it might be said, Nick Earls’s reciprocal use of the city in intermingling his own authorial identity and narratives with the identity and narratives of Brisbane) in i) the usefulness of literature in broadening the dimension of place, ii) the renovation of literature as a tool of cultural policy, but ii) the necessary subservience of the radical potential of literature to other functions, such as city marketing and the marketing of books.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings

 
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