The Reprofessionalization of Social Work: Collaborative Approaches for Achieving Professional Recognition

Healy, Karen and Meagher, Gabrielle (2004) The Reprofessionalization of Social Work: Collaborative Approaches for Achieving Professional Recognition. The British journal of social work, 34 2: 243-260. doi:10.1093/bjsw/bch024

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Author Healy, Karen
Meagher, Gabrielle
Title The Reprofessionalization of Social Work: Collaborative Approaches for Achieving Professional Recognition
Journal name The British journal of social work   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-3102
1468-263X
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/bjsw/bch024
Volume 34
Issue 2
Start page 243
End page 260
Total pages 18
Place of publication London
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
1607 Social Work
160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified
Abstract Contemporary practice theories assume that social workers have the capacity to enact their work as a thoughtful, analytic and creative activity, and that these capacities are, or should be, recognized and supported in human services organizations. However, emerging evidence from the front line of social services practice suggests that, despite public policy rhetoric emphasizing service quality, the practice environment is characterized by a lack of support for, if not outright hostility towards, professional social work. In this paper we will consider how the social work profession can collectively improve the recognition of their work as professional activity. We discuss the deprofessionalization of social services work and analyse collaborative strategies for achieving recognition, specifically the formation of professional associations and trade unions. We will focus our discussion on emerging convergences between new professionalism and the new political unionism. Finally, we consider how these new developments can enhance the industrial and cultural recognition of human services work.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 48 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 70 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 05 May 2009, 08:24:13 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services