Application of a stress and coping model to positive and negative adjustment outcomes in colorectal cancer caregiving

Ms Amber Fitzell (2008). Application of a stress and coping model to positive and negative adjustment outcomes in colorectal cancer caregiving Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ms Amber Fitzell
Thesis Title Application of a stress and coping model to positive and negative adjustment outcomes in colorectal cancer caregiving
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2008
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Abstract/Summary The present study examined relations between stress and coping predictors and negative and positive adjustment outcomes in colorectal cancer caregiving. A total of 622 carers and their care-recipients completed questionnaires. Some care-recipient data was also collected via completed computer-assisted telephone interviews. Predictors included care-recipient quality of life and cancer stage, carer gender, age, employment restriction, social support (satisfaction and availability), appraisal (stress, control and challenge) and coping (acceptance and problem solving, avoidance, substance use, religion, humour and seeking social support). Dependent variables were positive affect, satisfaction with life, positive states of mind, distress, and subjective health status. Correlations supported most hypothesised relations between the stress and coping predictors and adjustment outcomes. Results from hierarchical regression analyses indicated that after controlling for the effects of relevant background variables (carer age, carer gender, care-recipient quality of life, cancer stage and prevention from work), better carer adjustment was related to higher satisfaction with social support, lower stress appraisal and less reliance on avoidance and substance use coping, as hypothesised. Better carer adjustment refers to lower distress, higher positive affect, positive states of mind and life satisfaction, and better subjective physical health. Of the model predictors, in general stress appraisal emerged as the strongest and most consistent predictor of all positive and negative adjustment outcomes assessed. Findings support the utility of the stress and coping model in understanding adjustment to caregiving in colorectal cancer. The results are discussed with reference to future research and practical implications.

 
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Created: Thu, 30 Apr 2009, 15:52:07 EST by Ms Amber Fitzell