Effects of prolonged intense training, overtraining and detraining on skeletal muscle metabolites and enzymes

McGowan, Catherine M., Golland, Lorraine C., Evans, David L., Hodgson, David R. and Rose, Reuben J. (2002) Effects of prolonged intense training, overtraining and detraining on skeletal muscle metabolites and enzymes. Equine veterinary journal, 34 Suppl.34: 257-263. doi:10.1111/j.2042-3306.2002.tb05429.x


Author McGowan, Catherine M.
Golland, Lorraine C.
Evans, David L.
Hodgson, David R.
Rose, Reuben J.
Title Effects of prolonged intense training, overtraining and detraining on skeletal muscle metabolites and enzymes
Journal name Equine veterinary journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0425-1644
2042-3306
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.2042-3306.2002.tb05429.x
Volume 34
Issue Suppl.34
Start page 257
End page 263
Total pages 7
Place of publication Newmarket, England
Publisher Equine Veterinary Journal
Language eng
Subject 0707 Veterinary Sciences
Abstract Thirteen Standardbred horses trained intensively for 34 weeks and detrained for 12 weeks to investigate the effects of training, overtraining and detraining on muscle metabolites, buffering capacity and enzyme activities (CS, HAD and LDH). After a standardised exercise test to fatigue at 10 m/s (approximately 100% V̇O2max), there was significant depletion of [ATP], [PCr] and muscle [glycogen] and accumulation of muscle and plasma [lactate], [NH3] and elevated muscle temperature. After training, associated with increased run time to fatigue (148%), there was reduced depletion of muscle [glycogen] and increased [NH3] and muscle temperature at fatigue. Training resulted in increased muscle buffering capacity (19%) and activities of CS (29%) and HAD (32%) and reduced glycogen utilisation (1.32 mmol/s in week 1 to 0.58 mmol/s in week 32). Plasma [lactate] at fatigue increased with training as opposed to muscle [lactate] implying enhanced ability to remove lactate from muscle. Overtraining resulted in reduced run time and associated effects in overtrained horses. While muscle [glycogen] prior to exercise was lower in overtrained horses, glycogen utilisation/s was not reduced and it may not, therefore, have caused the reduced run time. Prolonged high intensity training caused primarily aerobic adaptations and poor performance associated with overtraining may not be due to metabolic disturbances.
Keyword horse
detraining
Overtraining
training
Enzymes
muscle
muscle metabolites
skeletal muscle
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 06 Apr 2006, 23:08:41 EST