Wildlife as reservoirs for parasites infecting commercial species: Host specificity and a redescription of Kudoa amamiensis from teleost fish in Australia

Burger, M. A. A., Barnes, A. C. and Adlard, R. D. (2008) Wildlife as reservoirs for parasites infecting commercial species: Host specificity and a redescription of Kudoa amamiensis from teleost fish in Australia. Journal of Fish Diseases, 31 11: 835-844.


Author Burger, M. A. A.
Barnes, A. C.
Adlard, R. D.
Title Wildlife as reservoirs for parasites infecting commercial species: Host specificity and a redescription of Kudoa amamiensis from teleost fish in Australia
Journal name Journal of Fish Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0140-7775
1365-2761
Publication date 2008-08-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2761.2008.00958.x
Volume 31
Issue 11
Start page 835
End page 844
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Blackwell Scientific Publications
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
070404 Fish Pests and Diseases
960407 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Marine Environments
Abstract Parasites of the genus Kudoa (Phylum Myxozoa) have long been known to cause considerable losses to finfish aquaculture. One such parasite species, Kudoa amamiensis, causes unsightly white cysts in the skeletal muscle of yellowtail kingfish, Seriola quinqueradiata, in Japan rendering the fillets unmarketable. The authors who characterized K. amamiensis, Egusa & Nakajima, 1980, hypothesized that yellowtail kingfish, as nonnatives to the area, were accidental hosts of the parasite and that it normally infects native reef fish (damselfish, Family Pomacentridae). Since then, we have found parasites that are consistent with the description of K. amamiensis in two species of damselfish and one species of carangid fish in Australia, and it has been recorded previously in another species of reef-associated fish. Our morphometric, histological and DNA results suggest that these specimens are K. amamiensis, and are new host records for that species. Furthermore, our observations show that reef fish may act as a reservoir of myxozoan infection for commercial species, and as such should be considered an infection pathway for species in aquaculture.
Keyword Aquaculture
Carangid
Kudoa amamiensis
Myxosporea
Parasite
Pomacentrid
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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