The Effects of Maize Rotation on Soil Quality and Nutrient Availability in Cotton Based Cropping

Devereux, Alison. F., Fukai, Shu and Hulugalle, Nilantha, R. (2008). The Effects of Maize Rotation on Soil Quality and Nutrient Availability in Cotton Based Cropping. In: M. Unkovich, Global Issues, Paddock Action: Proceedings of the 14th Australian Society of Agronomy Conference. 14th Australian Society of Agronomy Conference, Adelaide, South Australia, (). 21-25 September 2008.


Author Devereux, Alison. F.
Fukai, Shu
Hulugalle, Nilantha, R.
Title of paper The Effects of Maize Rotation on Soil Quality and Nutrient Availability in Cotton Based Cropping
Conference name 14th Australian Society of Agronomy Conference
Conference location Adelaide, South Australia
Conference dates 21-25 September 2008
Convener Australian Society of Agronomy
Proceedings title Global Issues, Paddock Action: Proceedings of the 14th Australian Society of Agronomy Conference
Place of Publication Gosford Australia
Publisher The Regional Institute
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN not found
Editor M. Unkovich
Total pages 4
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Rotation crops have been utilized by cotton producers in Australia since the early 1980’s for the perceived benefits to soil quality, cotton yield and profitability. The benefits of wheat and legume rotations on cotton crops have been well established. However maize rotation is becoming more popular and has recently become of interest due to anecdotal field evidence of increases in the following season’s cotton yields of up to 25%. Compared with continuous cotton cropping, a maize crop with more shoot and root biomass and a shallower root system may provide more organic matter to the soil and extract less water and nutrient from deeper soils, which would benefit the subsequent cotton crop. In order to test these ideas water stress trials were established in the rainout shelters at the University of Queensland Gatton campus. Water stress treatments were imposed 38 and 71 days after sowing. Soil moisture content was monitored using a neutron moisture meter and crop root growth was investigated with soil cores taken consistently throughout the growing season until crop maturity. The results of the prolonged water stress trial showed that maize had higher root mass in upper soil layers, but extracted less water in 30-70cm soil layers.
Subjects E1
820301 Cotton
070302 Agronomy
Keyword Water stress
soil water
root growth
rotation cropping
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Fri, 17 Apr 2009, 07:41:30 EST by Emma Cushworth on behalf of Faculty Of Nat Resources, Agric & Veterinary Sc