The feasibility of a home-based moderate-intensity physical activity intervention in obese children and adolescents

Conwell, Louise S., Trost, Stewart G., Spence, Luke, Brown, Wendy J. and Batch, Jennifer A. (2010) The feasibility of a home-based moderate-intensity physical activity intervention in obese children and adolescents. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 44 4: 250-255. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2008.046359


Author Conwell, Louise S.
Trost, Stewart G.
Spence, Luke
Brown, Wendy J.
Batch, Jennifer A.
Title The feasibility of a home-based moderate-intensity physical activity intervention in obese children and adolescents
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-3674
1473-0480
Publication date 2010-03
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsm.2008.046359
Volume 44
Issue 4
Start page 250
End page 255
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, Uniteed Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
920501 Child Health
920205 Health Education and Promotion
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
111712 Health Promotion
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To explore the feasibility of conducting a 10-week home-based physical activity (PA) program and to evaluate the changes in insulin sensitivity commensurate with the program in obese young people.

Design: Open-labelled intervention

Setting: Home-based intervention with clinical assessments at a tertiary paediatric hospital. Subjects 18 obese (BMI>International Obesity Task Force age and sex-specific cut-offs) children and adolescents (8-18 years, 11 girls/7 boys) were recruited. 15 participants (9 girls/6 boys, mean±SE age 11.8±0.6 years, BMI-SDS 3.5±0.1, 6 prepubertal / 9 pubertal) completed the intervention. Intervention The program comprised biweekly home-visits over 10 weeks with personalized plans implemented aiming to increase moderate-intensity PA. Pedometers and physical activity diaries were used as self-monitoring tools. The goals were to a) teach participants behavioural skills related to adopting and maintaining an active lifestyle and b) increase daily participation in PA.

Outcome measures: Mean steps per day were assessed. Insulin sensitivity (SI) assessed by the Frequently Sampled Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (FSIGT) and other components of the insulin resistance syndrome were measured.

Results: Mean steps per day increased significantly from 10,363±927 (baseline) to 13,013±1131 (week 10) (p<0.05). SI was also significantly increased despite no change in BMI-SDS and remained so after an additional 10-weeks follow-up.

Conclusions: The results suggest that such a home-based PA program is feasible. Insulin sensitivity improved without changes in BMI. More rigorous evaluations of such programs are warranted.
Keyword Children
Obesity
Home
Activitiy
Physical activity
Insulin
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 7 May 2008

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 13:44:45 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences