New evidence and revised interpretations of early agriculture in Highland New Guinea

Denham, Tim, Haberle, Simon and Lentfer, Carol (2004) New evidence and revised interpretations of early agriculture in Highland New Guinea. Antiquity, 78 302: 839-857.

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Author Denham, Tim
Haberle, Simon
Lentfer, Carol
Title New evidence and revised interpretations of early agriculture in Highland New Guinea
Journal name Antiquity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-598X
1745-1744
Publication date 2004-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 78
Issue 302
Start page 839
End page 857
Total pages 19
Place of publication York, U.K.
Publisher Antiquity Publications
Language eng
Subject 040308 Palaeontology (incl.Palynology)
040606 Quaternary Environments
210106 Archaeology of New Guinea and Pacific Islands (excl. New Zealand)
2101 Archaeology
Abstract This review of the evidence for early agriculture in New Guinea supported by new data from Kuk Swamp demonstrates that cultivation had begun there by at least 6950-6440 cal BP and probably much earlier. Contrary to previous ideas, the first farming in New Guinea was not owed to SouthEast Asia, but emerged independently in the Highlands. Indeed plants such as the banana were probably first domesticated in New Guinea and later diffused into the Asian continent.
Keyword Archaeology
Mid-Holocene
New Guinea Highlands
Agriculture
Musa bananas
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 09:49:05 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences