An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts

Kvennefors, E.Charlotte E., Leggat, William, Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove, Degnan, Bernard M. and Barnes, Andrew C. (2008) An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 32 12: 1582-1592.


Author Kvennefors, E.Charlotte E.
Leggat, William
Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove
Degnan, Bernard M.
Barnes, Andrew C.
Title An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts
Formatted title  An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts
Journal name Developmental and Comparative Immunology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0145-305X
1879-0089
Publication date 2008-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.dci.2008.05.010
Volume 32
Issue 12
Start page 1582
End page 1592
Total pages 11
Editor G. W.Warr
L. W. Clem
K.Soderhall
Place of publication New York, U.S.A.
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
1107 Immunology
Abstract Corals form the framework of the world’s coral reefs and are under threat from increases in disease and bleaching (symbiotic dysfunction), yet the mechanisms of pathogen and symbiont recognition remain largely unknown. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of an ancient mannose-binding lectin in the coral Acropora millepora, which is likely to be involved in both processes. The lectin (‘Millectin’) was isolated by affinity chromatography and was shown to bind to bacterial pathogens as well as coral symbionts, dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. cDNA analysis of Millectin indicate extensive sequence variation in the binding region, reflecting its ability to recognise various mannose-like carbohydrate structures on non-self cells, including symbionts and pathogens. This is the first mannose-binding lectin to show extensive sequence variability as observed for pattern recognition proteins in other invertebrate immune systems and, given that invertebrates rely on non-adaptive immunity, is a potential keystone component of coral defence mechanisms. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract Corals form the framework of the world’s coral reefs and are under threat from increases in disease and bleaching (symbiotic dysfunction), yet the mechanisms of pathogen and symbiont recognition remain largely unknown. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of an ancient mannose-binding lectin in the coral Acropora millepora, which is likely to be involved in both processes. The lectin (‘Millectin’) was isolated by affinity chromatography and was shown to bind to bacterial pathogens as well as coral symbionts, dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. cDNA analysis of Millectin indicate extensive sequence variation in the binding region, reflecting its ability to recognise various mannose-like carbohydrate structures on non-self cells, including symbionts and pathogens. This is the first mannose-binding lectin to show extensive sequence variability as observed for pattern recognition proteins in other invertebrate immune systems and, given that invertebrates rely on non-adaptive immunity, is a potential keystone component of coral defence mechanisms. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Coral
Symbiosis
Pattern recognition
Mannose-binding lectin
Sequence variability
Symbiodinium
Immunity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2009, 14:49:16 EST by Peter Fogarty on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies