Addressing Interindividual Variation within a Science Dissection-based Anatomy Course

Aland, Rachel C. and Kippers, Vaughan (2005). Addressing Interindividual Variation within a Science Dissection-based Anatomy Course. In: , Abstracts of the ANZACA 2005: 2nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists. ANZACA 2005: 2nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists, Dunedin, Otago, N.Z., (Abstract No. 1). 2-3 September 2005.


Author Aland, Rachel C.
Kippers, Vaughan
Title of paper Addressing Interindividual Variation within a Science Dissection-based Anatomy Course
Conference name ANZACA 2005: 2nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists
Conference location Dunedin, Otago, N.Z.
Conference dates 2-3 September 2005
Convener Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA)
Proceedings title Abstracts of the ANZACA 2005: 2nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists
Place of Publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publisher ANZACA
Publication Year 2005
Year available 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page Abstract No. 1
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary Purpose:The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of teaching the concept of human
interindividual variability within a science anatomy course based on dissection.

Methods: Interindividual variation in human anatomy is a concept not often addressed in textbooks.
However, variability became noticed in teaching a large, dissection-based course. To address this
concept and provide a framework for student learning and discussion, an assignment exploring
normality and variability in human anatomy, and potential clinical consequences of variations was set
as part of the assessment. This complemented the already existing lectures, practical classes and
tutorials.

Results: This assignment proved a valuable addition to assessment for this subject. Students
enthusiastically completed the task, which included information literacy sessions on locating relevant
articles in research-focussed journals. The assignments were completed to a very high standard. As
students worked in groups in the practical classes, the students chose different topics to research. This
had unexpected beneficial effects. Intra and intergroup learning was fostered, as students who were
‘expert’ on one topic taught others. Students became enthusiastic about searching for and identifying
variations during their dissection, and discussing their origins and consequences.

Conclusion: Human interindividual variability is an important and sometimes neglected topic in
anatomy education. This assignment is an example whereby this concept can be introduced to
students, providing them with a framework for identifying and understanding observed variations
without overwhelming them with details.
Subjects 130103 Higher Education
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Thu, 09 Apr 2009, 16:01:18 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of School of Biological Sciences