Social circumstances, social support, ageing and health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

Byles, J. E. and Pachana, N. (2006). Social circumstances, social support, ageing and health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. In: Susan Quine, Diversity in Ageing: Conference abstracts published in the Australasian Journal on Ageing. Australian Association of Gerontology 39th National Conference: Diversity in Ageing, Sydney, Australia, (9-9). 22-24 November 2006.


Author Byles, J. E.
Pachana, N.
Title of paper Social circumstances, social support, ageing and health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
Conference name Australian Association of Gerontology 39th National Conference: Diversity in Ageing
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 22-24 November 2006
Proceedings title Diversity in Ageing: Conference abstracts published in the Australasian Journal on Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Publication Year 2006
ISSN 1440-6381
Editor Susan Quine
Volume 25
Issue Supp. 1
Start page 9
End page 9
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper will synthesize findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health to provide information on socio-demographic factors that influence older women’s health and social wellbeing. The study involved 12,432 women across Australia who completed the initial survey in 1996 when they were aged 70–75 years. The cohort have been surveyed a further three times over the past 10 years. Analyses of these data have explored the relationship between socio-economic status and health, the impact of marital status on older women’s health and well-being, the health of carers, factors associated with social networks and social cohesiveness, the relationship between social support and health, and the change in women’s health over time. Some women have also participated in specific sub-studies to assess social support and related issues such as caring, and many women have taken the chance to describe openly the impact of their social circumstances on their lives. As the women describe, and as the data demonstrate, social factors can have at least as much influence on people’s health as biological factors. The social context of ageing is therefore of vital importance in understanding and promoting the wellbeing of people as they age.
Subjects 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Thu, 09 Apr 2009, 11:32:26 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of School of Psychology