Comparison of breed, slaughter weight and castration on fatty acid profiles in the longissimus thoracic muscle from male Boer and Australian feral goats

Werdi Pratiwi, N.M., Murray, P.J., Taylor, D.G. and Zhang, D. (2006) Comparison of breed, slaughter weight and castration on fatty acid profiles in the longissimus thoracic muscle from male Boer and Australian feral goats. Small Ruminant Research, 64 1-2: 94-100. doi:10.1016/j.smallrumres.2005.04.002


Author Werdi Pratiwi, N.M.
Murray, P.J.
Taylor, D.G.
Zhang, D.
Title Comparison of breed, slaughter weight and castration on fatty acid profiles in the longissimus thoracic muscle from male Boer and Australian feral goats
Journal name Small Ruminant Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0921-4488
Publication date 2006-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2005.04.002
Volume 64
Issue 1-2
Start page 94
End page 100
Total pages 7
Editor J. Boyazoglu
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 0908 Food Sciences
070202 Animal Growth and Development
Formatted abstract
This study was undertaken to examine the effect of breed, slaughter weight and castration on fatty acid profiles in the longissimus thoracic muscle from Boer and Australian feral goats.
Twenty-three male Boer and 21 male Australian feral goats were assigned to three slaughter weights target (5, 30, and 60 kg), and 10 kids from each breed were castrated. All fatty acid compositions determined of the longissimus thoracic muscle from Boer and Australian feral goats were significantly (P ≤ 0.01) affected by slaughter weight.
The fatty acid content of the longissimus thoracic muscles from both goat breeds were primarily composed of oleic acid (43.3–53.8%), followed by palmitic acid (22.5–27.9%) and stearic acid (10.7–18.1%).
Oleic and palmitic acids increased while stearic acid decreased with an increase in slaughter weight.
The percentage of stearic, linoleic and total saturated fatty acids were lower in muscle taken from the castrated animals in both breeds. Compared to the Australian feral bucks, the fatty acid content of longissimus thoracic muscle from the Boer goats contained higher unsaturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, which are considered as desirable fatty acids.
Thus the fatty acid profiles of longissimus thoracic muscle from Boer and Australian feral goats were affected by slaughter weight, and castration of bucks changed the fatty acid profiles.
For health conscious consumers of goat meat, the longissimus thoracic muscle from Boer goats is healthier, in term of its fatty acids composition than the longissimus thoracic muscle from Australian feral goats.
Keyword Boer goat
Feral goat
Castration
Fatty acid
Longissimus thoracic muscle
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2009, 14:23:54 EST by Maria Campbell on behalf of School of Animal Studies