The Effect of Mammographic Screening and Hormone Replacement Therapy Use on Breast Cancer Incidence in England and Wales

Waller, Michael, Moss, Sue, Watson, Joanna and Moller, Henrik (2007) The Effect of Mammographic Screening and Hormone Replacement Therapy Use on Breast Cancer Incidence in England and Wales. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 16 11: 2257-2261. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0262


Author Waller, Michael
Moss, Sue
Watson, Joanna
Moller, Henrik
Title The Effect of Mammographic Screening and Hormone Replacement Therapy Use on Breast Cancer Incidence in England and Wales
Journal name Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1055-9965
Publication date 2007-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0262
Volume 16
Issue 11
Start page 2257
End page 2261
Total pages 5
Place of publication Birmingham, AL
Publisher American Association for Cancer Research
Language eng
Subject 010402 Biostatistics
111706 Epidemiology
Abstract Design: An extended age-period-cohort model was used to estimate the effect of mammographic screening and hormone replacement therapy on breast cancer incidence in England and Wales between 1971 and 2001. Results: Incidence of breast cancer increased noticeably in women attending screening for the first time compared with nonattenders [rate ratio (RR), 1.73; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.67-1.80]. Incidence was also 18% to 35% higher in attenders relative to nonattenders in subsequent screening rounds. In the first 3 years after women left the screening program, rates of breast cancer were reduced (RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.86-0.90), but by 7 to 9 years after screening, the rates had returned to the expected level (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-1.00). The estimated RR of hormone replacement therapy on breast cancer incidence was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.37-1.75). Screening is estimated to increase a woman's lifetime risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer from 7.8% to 8.6%. Conclusions: It is estimated that in the absence of screening, rates of breast cancer incidence would have continued to increase. A study at the individual subject level would be beneficial to assess the level of overdiagnosis associated with breast cancer screening. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2007;16(11):2257–61)
Keyword Mammographic screening
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
Screening
Breast cancer
Effect
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Military and Veterans' Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 07 Apr 2009, 13:25:12 EST by Juliette Grosvenor on behalf of Centre for Australian Military & Veterans' Health