The contribution of self-help organisations to chronic disease self-management, and their linkages with general practitioners

Boyle, F., Dick, M. L., Mutch, A., Dean, J. and Del Mar, C. (2005). The contribution of self-help organisations to chronic disease self-management, and their linkages with general practitioners. In: GP & PHC Research Conference Abstracts 2005. 2005 GP & PHC Research Conference: Getting Research Right for Policy and Practice, Adelaide, Australia, (). 26-28 July, 2005.


Author Boyle, F.
Dick, M. L.
Mutch, A.
Dean, J.
Del Mar, C.
Title of paper The contribution of self-help organisations to chronic disease self-management, and their linkages with general practitioners
Conference name 2005 GP & PHC Research Conference: Getting Research Right for Policy and Practice
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 26-28 July, 2005
Proceedings title GP & PHC Research Conference Abstracts 2005
Place of Publication South Australia
Publisher Primary Health Care Research and Information Service.
Publication Year 2005
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Self-help organisations (SHOs) can provide, at relatively low cost, supportive and educational services otherwise unavailable in the health care system (Wagner et al., 1999) but their actual and potential contribution to primary health care, or to the support of those with chronic illness is unknown. This research project aims to investigate the potential to strengthen linkages between general practice (GP) and the self-help sector for enhanced chronic illness care. Methods This study proposes two major components: a comprehensive survey of approximately 300 people who contact chronic illness-focused SHOs�to explore such issues as who uses chronic disease-related SHOs, how, why and with what benefits; and a randomised controlled trial of a general practice-based SHO referral strategy involving 650 patients with chronic diseases. The referral strategy will be evaluated in terms of: referral and access to the SHO sector; frequency and type of SHO usage; and a range of chronic illness related outcomes among general practice patients. Principal Findings We have just been awarded funding for this project (April 2005, APHCRI)Details of the project methodology and progress to date will be presented, in addition to the results of a pilot study of the feasibility of recruiting SHOs, general practitioners, and patients with chronic diseases into the study. Implications This project, grounded in a population health approach, will address significant knowledge gaps in relation to: (i) the benefits, limitations and potential of SHOs for people with chronic illness; (ii) best practice relating to GP referral pathways to the self-help sector; and (iii) the strengths and limitations of a new model of GP-SHO linkages.
Subjects 111717 Primary Health Care
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Tue, 07 Apr 2009, 10:35:15 EST by Maryanne Watson on behalf of Community Health and General Practice