Cortisol changes interact with the effects of a cognitive behavioural psychological preparation for surgery on 12-month outcomes for surgical heart patients

Shelley, Michael, Pakenham, Kenneth Ian and Frazer, Ian (2009) Cortisol changes interact with the effects of a cognitive behavioural psychological preparation for surgery on 12-month outcomes for surgical heart patients. Psychology & Health, 24 10: 1139-1152. doi:10.1080/08870440802126704


Author Shelley, Michael
Pakenham, Kenneth Ian
Frazer, Ian
Title Cortisol changes interact with the effects of a cognitive behavioural psychological preparation for surgery on 12-month outcomes for surgical heart patients
Journal name Psychology & Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0887-0446
1476-8321
Publication date 2009-12-09
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08870440802126704
Volume 24
Issue 10
Start page 1139
End page 1152
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
110201 Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases)
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
920205 Health Education and Promotion
920401 Behaviour and Health
1701 Psychology
Abstract Previous studies offer contradictory evidence regarding the effects of cortisol changes on health outcomes for surgical heart patients. Increased cortisol and inflammation have been related to psychological stress while separate studies have found an inverse relation between cortisol and inflammation. Psychological preparations for surgery can reduce stress and improve outcomes and may interact with cortisol changes. Following from these relationships, we hypothesised that a preparation for surgery will interact with changes in cortisol to affect outcomes. Measures were the SF 36 General Health and Activities, medical visits and satisfaction. Eighty-five patients were randomly assigned to standard care plus a psychological preparation or standard care alone using a single-blind methodology. Data on psychological and biological functioning were collected at admission, 1 day prior and 5 days post-surgery, and 12-months after hospital discharge. General health and activities, and medical visits were related to the interaction of cortisol change and psychological preparation in support of the hypothesis. Patients were more satisfied in the preparation group than controls. Based on these findings, some outcomes from psychological preparations may be affected by changes in levels of cortisol. These results caution against a one-size-fits-all approach to psychological preparations.
Keyword Cortisol
Quality of life
Heart disease
CABG
Medical visits
Cognitive behavioural preparation for surgery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Article first published online 9th December 2008.

 
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Created: Tue, 07 Apr 2009, 09:26:14 EST by Kylie Hengst on behalf of School of Psychology