Fitness and fatness in adolescence and adulthood as determinants of large artery properties at age 36

Ferreira, I., Twisk, J. W. R., van Mechelen, W., Stehouwer, C. D. A. and Kemper, H. C. G. (2004). Fitness and fatness in adolescence and adulthood as determinants of large artery properties at age 36. In H.C.G. Kemper (Ed.), Amsterdam growth and Health longitudinal Study (AGAHLS): a 23-Year follow-up from teenager to adult about lifestyle and health (pp. 78-100) Basel, Switzerland: Karger. doi:10.1159/000076197


Author Ferreira, I.
Twisk, J. W. R.
van Mechelen, W.
Stehouwer, C. D. A.
Kemper, H. C. G.
Title of chapter Fitness and fatness in adolescence and adulthood as determinants of large artery properties at age 36
Title of book Amsterdam growth and Health longitudinal Study (AGAHLS): a 23-Year follow-up from teenager to adult about lifestyle and health
Place of Publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher Karger
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1159/000076197
Series Medicine and Sport Science
ISBN 9783805576529
9783318010299
3805576528
ISSN 0254-5020
Editor H.C.G. Kemper
Volume number 47
Start page 78
End page 100
Total pages 23
Language eng
Subjects 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background/Aims: Low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), and excess total and central fatness are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but little is known to what extent this is related to their effects on atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Moreover, the timecourse of these relationships and the relative effects of fitness and total and central fatness need to be elucidated. We therefore investigated the relationships between fitness, total and central fatness on the one hand (determinants) and large-artery properties on the other (outcomes). This was done cross-sectionally (at age 36) and prospectively (i.e. determinants measured during adolescence and outcomes at age 36).

Methods: Arterial properties were assessed non-invasively by ultrasound imaging. VO2max was measured with a maximal running test on a treadmill. Total and central fatness were assessed by anthropometry. Cross-sectional analyses consisted of 345 subjects (180 women) and prospective analyses of a sub-population of 159 subjects (84 girls).

Results: Current and adolescent levels of fitness were inversely and independently associated with carotid IMT, a pre-clinical indicator of atherosclerosis, but only in men. Total and central fatness (the latter in men only) during adolescence, but not at age 36, were positively and independently associated with carotid IMT. Only current levels of fitness were positively associated with arterial stiffness. Central but not overall fatness was independently associated with arterial stiffness and some of these associations had their roots already in adolescence. There were no significant fitness-fatness/central fatness interactions in the above relationships.

Conclusion: Both low levels of fitness and high levels of fatness, in particular central fatness, can be deleterious for large-artery properties, independently of each other and other risk factors. As the roots of these associations were already present in adolescence this study supports public health policies aiming at the improvement of fitness and decrease of (central) fatness starting early in life.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Additional Notes Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study (AGAHLS) A 23-Year Follow-Up from Teenager to Adult about Lifestyle and Health Editor(s): Kemper, H.C.G. (Amsterdam) VIII + 198 p., 50 fig., 3 in color, 39 tab., hard cover, 2004 SBN: 3-8055-7652-8 ISBN-13: 978-3-8055-7652-9 e-ISBN: 978-3-318-01029-9

 
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Created: Mon, 06 Apr 2009, 09:13:24 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences