Influence of dietary components on development of the microbiota in single-stomached species

Bauer, Eva, Williams, Barbara A., Smidt, Hauke, Mosenthin, Rainer and Verstegen, Martin W. A . (2006) Influence of dietary components on development of the microbiota in single-stomached species. Nutrition research reviews, 19 1: 63-78. doi:10.1079/NRR2006123


Author Bauer, Eva
Williams, Barbara A.
Smidt, Hauke
Mosenthin, Rainer
Verstegen, Martin W. A .
Title Influence of dietary components on development of the microbiota in single-stomached species
Journal name Nutrition research reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-2700
0954-4224
Publication date 2006-06-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1079/NRR2006123
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 63
End page 78
Total pages 16
Place of publication Cambridge
Publisher Cambridge University Press for the Nutrition Soceity
Language eng
Subject 070204 Animal Nutrition
Abstract After birth, development of a normal microbial community occurs gradually, and is affected by factors such as the composition of the maternal gut microbiota, the environment, and the host genome. Diet also has a direct influence, both on composition and activity of this community. This influence begins with the milk, when specific components exert their growth-promoting effect on a beneficial microbiota, thereby suppressing potential pathogens. For example, breast-fed infants compared with formula-fed babies usually have a microbial community dominated by bifidobacteria. When solid food is introduced (weaning), dramatic changes in microbial composition occur, so pathogens can gain access to the disturbed gastrointestinal (GI) ecosystem. However, use of specific dietary components can alter the composition and activity of the microbiota positively. Of all dietary components, fermentable carbohydrates seem to be most promising in terms of promoting proliferation of beneficial bacterial species. Carbohydrate fermentation results in the production of SCFA which are known for their trophic and health-promoting effects. Fermentation of proteins, on the other hand, is often associated with growth of potential pathogens, and results in production of detrimental substances including NH3 and amines. In terms of the GI microbiota, lipids are often associated with the antimicrobial activity of medium-chain fatty acids and their derivatives. The present review aims to provide deeper insights into the composition and development of the neonatal GI microbiota, how this microbiota can be influenced by certain dietary components, and how this might ultimately lead to improvements in host health.
Keyword Diet
Fermentation
Gastrointestinal tract
Microbial community
Single-stomached species
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Apr 2009, 01:08:07 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences