Development of Fatness, Fitness, and Lifestyle From Adolescence to the Age of 36 Years: Determinants of the Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study

Ferreira, Isabel, Twisk, Jos W. R., van Mechelen, Willem, Kemper, Han C. G. and Stehouwer, Coen D. A. (2005) Development of Fatness, Fitness, and Lifestyle From Adolescence to the Age of 36 Years: Determinants of the Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165 1: 42-48. doi:10.1001/archinte.165.1.42

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Author Ferreira, Isabel
Twisk, Jos W. R.
van Mechelen, Willem
Kemper, Han C. G.
Stehouwer, Coen D. A.
Title Development of Fatness, Fitness, and Lifestyle From Adolescence to the Age of 36 Years: Determinants of the Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study
Journal name Archives of Internal Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-9926
Publication date 2005-01-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1001/archinte.165.1.42
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 165
Issue 1
Start page 42
End page 48
Total pages 7
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher American Medical Association
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Among young adults, the metabolic syndrome is an increasingly frequent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Its determinants are, however, incompletely understood. We investigated the time course, from adolescence (age, 13 years) to young adulthood (age, 36 years), of important potential determinants (body fatness and fat distribution, cardiopulmonary fitness, and lifestyle) in 364 individuals (189 women).

Methods Data were derived from the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study and analyzed with the use of generalized estimating equations.

Results The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome at the age of 36 years, as identified with a modified National Cholesterol Education Program definition of the syndrome, was 10.4%. Subjects with the metabolic syndrome at the age of 36 years, compared with those without the syndrome, had (from adolescence to the age of 36 years) the following: (1) a more marked increase in total body fatness and in subcutaneous trunk fat; (2) a more marked decrease in cardiopulmonary fitness levels; (3) a more marked increase in physical activities of light-to-moderate intensity, but a more marked decrease in hard physical activities; (4) a trend toward a higher energy intake throughout the years; and (5) a decreased likelihood of drinking alcoholic beverages.

Conclusions Fatness, fitness, and lifestyle are important determinants of the metabolic syndrome in young adults. More important, these associations were independent of each other and, therefore, represent separate potential targets for the prevention of the metabolic syndrome. Our study further suggests that intervening early in life (eg, in the period of transition from adolescence to adulthood) may be a fruitful area for prevention of the metabolic syndrome.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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