Effects of resistance and functional-skills training on habitual activity and constipation among older adults living in long-term care facilities: a randomized controlled trial

Chin A Paw, Marijke J. M., van Poppel, Mireille N. M. and van Mechelen, Willem (2006) Effects of resistance and functional-skills training on habitual activity and constipation among older adults living in long-term care facilities: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 6 1-9. doi:10.1186/1471-2318-6-9


Author Chin A Paw, Marijke J. M.
van Poppel, Mireille N. M.
van Mechelen, Willem
Title Effects of resistance and functional-skills training on habitual activity and constipation among older adults living in long-term care facilities: a randomized controlled trial
Journal name BMC Geriatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2318
Publication date 2006-07-31
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2318-6-9
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
Formatted abstract
Background
Large-scale RCTs comparing different types of exercise training in institutionalised older people are scarce, especially regarding effects on habitual physical activity and constipation. This study investigated the effects of different training protocols on habitual physical activity and constipation of older adults living in long-term care facilities.

Methods
A randomized controlled trial with 157 participants, aged 64 to 94 years, who were randomly assigned to 1) resistance training; 2) all-round functional-skills training; 3) both; or 4) an 'educational' control condition. Habitual physical activity was assessed with a physical activity questionnaire and accelerometers. Constipation was assessed by a questionnaire. Measurements were performed at baseline and after six months of training.

Results
At baseline the median time spent sitting was 8.2 hr/d, the median time spent on activity of at least moderate intensity was 32 min/d. At baseline, about 22% of the subjects were diagnosed with constipation and 23% were taking laxatives. There were no between-group differences for changes in habitual physical activity or constipation over 6-months.

Conclusion
Six months of moderate intensity exercise training neither enhances habitual physical activity nor affects complaints of constipation among older people living in long-term care facilities. 
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 33 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 10:15:48 EST by Jason Parr on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences