Review of Ilya Kutik, Writing as Exorcism: The Personal Codes of Pushkin, Lermontov, and Gogol (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2005), xiii + 152 pp.

McNair, W. John (2008) Review of Ilya Kutik, Writing as Exorcism: The Personal Codes of Pushkin, Lermontov, and Gogol (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2005), xiii + 152 pp.. Australian Slavonic and East European Studies, 22 1-2: 184-186.


Author McNair, W. John
Title Review of Ilya Kutik, Writing as Exorcism: The Personal Codes of Pushkin, Lermontov, and Gogol (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2005), xiii + 152 pp.
Formatted title
Review of Ilya Kutik, Writing as Exorcism: The Personal Codes of Pushkin, Lermontov, and Gogol (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2005), xiii + 152 pp.
Journal name Australian Slavonic and East European Studies
ISSN 0818-8149
0919-8149
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
Open Access Status Link (no DOI)
Volume 22
Issue 1-2
Start page 184
End page 186
Total pages 3
Editor W. J. M. McNair
L. Morgan
Place of publication St. Lucia, Qld, Australia
Publisher School of Languages & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Queensland
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject CX
200509 Central and Eastern European Literature (incl. Russian)
970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
1605 Policy and Administration
Formatted abstract
Ilya Kutik, Russian ‘metarealist’ poet turned American Slavist, describes these studies of Pushkin, Lermontov and Gogol as ‘unabashedly idiosyncratic’. Their starting point is the notion of literature as exorcism, as a means by which authors give expression in their works to their inner struggle with their personal demons and fears by means of a ‘personal code’ (accessible also to those who know how to read it), so investing them with an ‘extra’ significance as the product of the ‘psychological dominants’ with which they must engage or contend. What follows, then, is an extended exercise in literary cryptanalysis combining (but transcending) the approaches of intertextuality and biographism: thus, recognition of the biographical fact of Gogol’s repeated recourse to pseudonyms, and the (putative) intertextual parallels linking them to the Iliad or the Bible can lead us to the discovery of the author’s personal code and one of his psychological dominants: ‘his fear of his own name’
Q-Index Code CX

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 17:31:26 EST by Jo Grimmond on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures