Pharmacogenetics of thiopurines

Oancea, I. and Duley, J. A. (2008). Pharmacogenetics of thiopurines. In Laurence L. Brunton, Keith L. Parker, Donald K. Blumenthal and Iain L.O. Buxton. (Ed.), Goodman and Gilman's the Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics 11th [electronic] ed. (pp. xx-xx) New York, United States: McGraw-Hill Medical.

Author Oancea, I.
Duley, J. A.
Title of chapter Pharmacogenetics of thiopurines
Title of book Goodman and Gilman's the Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics
Place of Publication New York, United States
Publisher McGraw-Hill Medical
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Open Access Status
Edition 11th [electronic]
ISBN 9780071593236
0071593233
Editor Laurence L. Brunton
Keith L. Parker
Donald K. Blumenthal
Iain L.O. Buxton.
Start page xx
End page xx
Total pages 7
Total chapters 65
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subjects B1
730000 - Health
320000 Medical and Health Sciences
92 Health
11 Medical and Health Sciences
1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Abstract/Summary The thiopurines (mercaptopurine, azathioprine and thioguanine) have been highly successful drugs, heralding the era of organ transplantation, providing maintenance therapy in the treatment of leukemias,1 and proving useful for treating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions (see: Chapter 38).2,3 Overall, the therapeutic success rate for thiopurines is 65-70%; treatment is withdrawn in 20-25% of patients due to side effects (including ~2% bone marrow suppression)4 and another 10% because of non-responsiveness.
Keyword Thiopurines
Organ transplantaion
Leukaemia
Chronic inflammatory conditions
Autoimmune disease
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes Update 5/2/2008 Related to: Chapter 3. Drug Metabolism; Chapter 38. Pharmacotherapy of Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Chapter 4. Pharmacogenetics; Chapter 51. Antineoplastic Agents

 
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Created: Tue, 31 Mar 2009, 12:44:14 EST by Elizabeth Pyke on behalf of School of Pharmacy