Mouth width prediction in craniofacial identification: cadaver tests of four recent methods, including two techniques for edentulous skulls

Stephan, C. N. and Murphy, S. J. (2008) Mouth width prediction in craniofacial identification: cadaver tests of four recent methods, including two techniques for edentulous skulls. Journal of Forensic Odonto-Stomatology, 26 1: 2-7.

Author Stephan, C. N.
Murphy, S. J.
Title Mouth width prediction in craniofacial identification: cadaver tests of four recent methods, including two techniques for edentulous skulls
Journal name Journal of Forensic Odonto-Stomatology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0258-414X
Publication date 2008
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 2
End page 7
Total pages 6
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Publisher nternational Organization for Forensic Odonto-Stomatology
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject 069901 Forensic Biology
320800 Dentistry
Abstract An understanding of the structural relationships between the soft tissue anatomy of the face and the hard tissue anatomy of the skull is significant for craniofacial identification methods employed in forensic anthropology and forensic dentistry. Typically, mouth characteristics have been predicted from the teeth but this proves problematic in edentulous skulls. Some clue may, however, be provided by non-dental features. This study investigates the usefulness of the infraorbital and the mental foramen position for determining mouth width and additionally reports on accuracy tests using two other recently proposed methods that depend on the teeth: i) Krogman and İşcan's radiating mouth width prediction guideline; and ii) Stephan and Henneberg's 75% rule. Dissections of nine human cadavers indicate that the most accurate mouth width prediction method is the 75% rule (mean error of -2.4mm) followed by the distance between the infraorbital foramen (mean error of -3.3mm). Krogman and İşcan's radiating method, as interpreted by Wilkinson, underestimated mouth width by 7.3mm on average, while the distance between the mental foramen underestimated mouth width by 12.9mm. These results suggest that the infraorbital foramen can be used as a relatively good predictor of mouth width in edentulous skulls, however, the 75% rule should be given precedence if the dentition is present.
Keyword Facial approximation
Facial reconstruction
Facial reproduction
Forensic anthropology
Forensic science
Video Superimposition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 30 Mar 2009, 10:18:25 EST by Shirley Rey on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences