Cohort Profile: The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study

Paterson, J., Percival, T., Schluter, Philip J., Sundborn, G., Abbott, M., Carter, S., Cowley-Malcolm, E., Borrows, J., Goa, W. and PIF Study Group (2008) Cohort Profile: The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 37 2: 273-279.


Author Paterson, J.
Percival, T.
Schluter, Philip J.
Sundborn, G.
Abbott, M.
Carter, S.
Cowley-Malcolm, E.
Borrows, J.
Goa, W.
PIF Study Group
Title Cohort Profile: The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study
Journal name International Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-5771
Publication date 2008-04
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ije/dym171
Volume 37
Issue 2
Start page 273
End page 279
Total pages 7
Editor George Davey Smith
Shah Ebrahim
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
920210 Nursing
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
920305 Maori Health - Health Status and Outcomes
111713 Maori Health
Abstract In New Zealand, the Pacific population (those resident with a Pacific Islands heritage) is one of the fastest growing population subgroups and on census night, 7 March 2006, numbered 265 974 usual residents or 6.6% of the total population.1 Auckland is the preferred region of domicile.2 Samoans constitute the largest group (50%), followed by Cook Island Maori (23%), Tongan (18%), Niuean (9%), Fijian (3%), Tokelauan (3%) and Tuvalu Islanders (1%).2 This ethnic diversity is manifest in differing cultures, languages, and differential access to and utilization of education, health and social services. Pacific people are over-represented in many adverse health and social statistics2–4 leading to higher rates of communicable and non-communicable disease,2,4,5 hospitalization3,4,6 and death.2 Yet, prior to this study, there was relatively little culturally specific information on which to base efficacious coordinated public health interventions for this ethnic group.7 The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study, a birth cohort study, was developed through a process of collaboration with Pacific communities, researchers, and relevant health and social agencies to provide this much needed information. At inception, the PIF study had two directors, Dr Janis Paterson and Dr Colin Tukuitonga, a number of Pacific and non-Pacific investigators, and a team of Pacific field staff. An independent Pacific People's Advisory Board, composed of community representatives, was established to guide the directors and the management team in the scientific and cultural directions of the research. The Plunket Society (a not-for-profit society with clinical staff and volunteer network, and the largest provider of services to support the health and development of children under five8) also worked closely with the PIF research team. Grants were awarded from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST) in 1998 and the Health Research Council (HRC) in 1999 to undertake a pilot study that enabled instruments, recruitment and interview procedures to be tested and refined. The main study commenced in 2000 and has been principally funded from FRST, with supplementary studies funded by multiple national and regional agencies. To date, the study has received approximately NZD$4.42 million in funding.
Formatted abstract In New Zealand, the Pacific population (those resident with a Pacific Islands heritage) is one of the fastest growing population subgroups and on census night, 7 March 2006, numbered 265 974 usual residents or 6.6% of the total population.1 Auckland is the preferred region of domicile.2 Samoans constitute the largest group (50%), followed by Cook Island Maori (23%), Tongan (18%), Niuean (9%), Fijian (3%), Tokelauan (3%) and Tuvalu Islanders (1%).2 This ethnic diversity is manifest in differing cultures, languages, and differential access to and utilization of education, health and social services. Pacific people are over-represented in many adverse health and social statistics2–4 leading to higher rates of communicable and non-communicable disease,2,4,5 hospitalization3,4,6 and death.2 Yet, prior to this study, there was relatively little culturally specific information on which to base efficacious coordinated public health interventions for this ethnic group.7

The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study, a birth cohort study, was developed through a process of collaboration with Pacific communities, researchers, and relevant health and social agencies to provide this much needed information. At inception, the PIF study had two directors, Dr Janis Paterson and Dr Colin Tukuitonga, a number of Pacific and non-Pacific investigators, and a team of Pacific field staff. An independent Pacific People's Advisory Board, composed of community representatives, was established to guide the directors and the management team in the scientific and cultural directions of the research. The Plunket Society (a not-for-profit society with clinical staff and volunteer network, and the largest provider of services to support the health and development of children under five8) also worked closely with the PIF research team.

Grants were awarded from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST) in 1998 and the Health Research Council (HRC) in 1999 to undertake a pilot study that enabled instruments, recruitment and interview procedures to be tested and refined. The main study commenced in 2000 and has been principally funded from FRST, with supplementary studies funded by multiple national and regional agencies. To date, the study has received approximately NZD$4.42 million in funding.

References 1 Statistics New Zealand. In: QuickStata about New Zealand's Population and Dwellings: Revised 18 May 2007. (2007) Wellington: Statistics New Zealand. 2 Statistics New Zealand. Pacific Progress: A report on the economic status of Pacific peoples in New Zealand. (2002) Wellington: Statistics New Zealand. 3 Bathgate M, Donnell A, Mitikulena A. The Health of Pacific Islands People in New Zealand. Analysis and Monitoring Report 2. (1994) Wellington: Public Health Commission. 4 Ministry of Health. The Health of Pacific Peoples. (2005) Wellington: Ministry of Health. 5 Ministry of Health. Te Orau Ora: Pacific Mental Health Profile. (2005) Wellington: Ministry of Health. 6 Tukuitonga CR, Bell S, Robinson E. Hospital admission among Pacific children Auckland 1992-97. NZ Med J (2000) 113:358–61.[ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 7 Mitaera J. Pacific Children's Issues in the Next Five Years: Commentary to the Seminar on Children's Policy. Paper presented at: Seminar on Children's Policy Agenda for Children, 19–20 July, 2000: Wellington. 8 Royal New Zealand Plunket Society. (Accessed April 29, 2005). Plunket on-line. http://www.plunket.org.nz. 9 Paterson J, Tukuitonga CR, Abbott M, et al. Pacific Islands Families First Two Years of Life study: design and methodology. NZ Med J (2006) 119:U1814.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 10 Paterson J, Schluter P, Percival T, Carter S. Immunisation of a cohort Pacific children living in New Zealand over the first 2 years of life. Vaccine (2006) 24:4883–89.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 11 Paterson J, Percival T, Butler S, Williams M. Maternal and demographic factors associated with non-immunisation of Pacific infants living in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2004) 117:U994.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 12 Paterson J, Carter S, Wallace J, Ahmad Z, Garrett N, Silva P. Pacific Islands Families Study: risk factors associated with otitis media with effusion among Pacific 2-year-old children. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol (2007) 71:1047–54.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 13 Schluter P, Durward C, Cartwright S, Paterson J. Maternal self-report of oral health in 4-year-old Pacific children from South Auckland, New Zealand: findings from the Pacific Islands Families Study. J Public Health Dent (2007) 67:69–77.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 14 Cowley E, Paterson J, Williams M. Traditional gift giving among Pacific families in New Zealand. J Fam Econ Issues (2004) 25:431–44.[Get it at UQ Library] 15 Schluter PJ, Paterson J, Feehan M. Prevalence and concordance of interpersonal violence reports from intimate partners: findings from the Pacific Islands Families Study. J Epidemiol Community Health (2007) 61:624–30.[Get it at UQ Library] 16 Paterson J, Feehan M, Butler S, Williams M, Cowley-Malcolm E. Intimate partner violence within a cohort of Pacific mothers living in New Zealand. J Interpers Violence (2007) 22:698–721.[Abstract/Free Full Text] 17 Paterson J, Cowley E, Percival T, Williams M. Pregnancy planning by mothers of Pacific infants recently delivered at Middlemore Hospital. NZ Med J (2004) 117:U744.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 18 Low P, Paterson J, Wouldes T, Carter S, Williams M, Percival T. Factors affecting antenatal care attendance by mothers of Pacific infants living in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2005) 118:U1489.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 19 Gao W, Paterson J, Carter S, Percival T. Risk factors for preterm and small-for-gestational-age babies: a cohort from the Pacific Islands Families Study. J Paediatr Child Health (2006) 42:785–92.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 20 Paterson J, Tukuitonga C, Butler S, Williams M. Awareness of Sudden Infant Death risk factors among mothers of Pacific infants in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2002) 115:33–35.[ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 21 Paterson J, Tukuitonga C, Butler S, Williams M. Infant bed-sharing among Pacific families in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2002) 115:241–43.[ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 22 Schluter P, Paterson J, Percival T. Infant care practices associated with sudden infant death syndrome: findings from the Pacific Islands Families study. J Paediatr Child Health (2007) 43:388–93.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 23 Butler S, Tukuitonga C, Paterson J, Williams M. Infant feeding and feeding problems experienced by mothers of a birth cohort of Pacific infants in New Zealand. Pac Health Dialog (2002) 9:34–39.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 24 Butler S, Williams M, Tukuitonga C, Paterson J. Factors associated with not breastfeeding exclusively among mothers of a cohort of Pacific infants in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2004) 117:U908.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 25 Schluter P, Carter S, Percival T. Exclusive and any breastfeeding rates of Pacific infants in Auckland: data from the Pacific Islands Families First Two-Years of Life study. Public Health Nutr (2006) 9:692–99.[ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 26 Schluter P, Paterson J, Percival T. Non-fatal injuries among Pacific infants in Auckland: data from the Pacific Islands families first two years of life study. J Paediatr Child Health (2006) 42:123–28.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 27 Paterson J, Carter S, Gao W, Perese L. Pacific Islands Families Study: behavioral problems among two-year-old Pacific children living in New Zealand. J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2007) 48:514–22.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 28 Paterson J, Carter S, Williams M, Tukuitonga C. Health problems among six-week old Pacific infants living in New Zealand. Med Sci Monit (2006) 12:CR51–54.[ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 29 Abbott M, Williams M. Postnatal depressive symptoms among Pacific mothers in Auckland: prevalence and risk factors. Aust NZ J Psychiatry (2006) 40:230–38.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 30 Schluter P, Carter S, Kokaua J. Indices and perception of crowding in Pacific households domicile within Auckland, New Zealand: findings from the Pacific Islands Families Study. NZ Med J (2007) 120:U2393.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 31 Carter S, Paterson J, Williams M. Housing tenure: Pacific families in New Zealand. Urban Policy Res (2005) 23:411–26.[Get it at UQ Library] 32 Butler S, Williams M, Tukuitonga C, Paterson J. Problems with damp and cold housing among Pacific families in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2003) 116:U494.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 33 Butler S, Williams M, Paterson J, Tukuitonga C. Smoking among mothers of a Pacific Island birth cohort in New Zealand: associated factors. NZ Med J (2004) 117:U1171.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 34 Carter S, Percival T, Paterson J, Williams M. Maternal smoking: risks related to maternal asthma and reduced birth weight in a Pacific Island birth cohort in New Zealand. NZ Med J (2006) 119:U2081.[Medline][Get it at UQ Library] 35 Carter S, Paterson J, Gao W, Iusitini L. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and behaviour problems in a birth cohort of 2-year-old Pacific children in New Zealand. Early Hum Dev (2007) doi:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2007.03.009. 36 Bellringer M, Perese L, Abbott M, Williams M. Gambling amongst Pacific mothers living in New Zealand. Int Gambling Stud (2006) 6:217–35.[CrossRef][Get it at UQ Library] 37 Schluter P, Bellringer M, Abbott M. Maternal gambling associated with families’ food, shelter and safety needs: findings from the Pacific Islands Families Study. J Gambling Issues (2007) 19:87–90.[Get it at UQ Library] 38 Fairbairn-Dunlop P, Paterson J, Cowley E. Maternal experiences of childhood: Pacific mothers in New Zealand. Pac Stud (2005) 28:291–309.[Get it at UQ Library] 39 Poland M, Paterson J, Carter S, Gao W, Perese L, Stillman S. Pacific Islands Family Study: factors associated with living in extended families one year on from the birth of a child. Kotuitui (2007) 2:17–28.[Get it at UQ Library]
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery Publications
 
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