Darwin as the frontier capital: theatrical depictions of city space in the north

Carleton, Stephen (2008) Darwin as the frontier capital: theatrical depictions of city space in the north. Australasian Drama Studies, 52 52-68.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Carleton, Stephen
Title Darwin as the frontier capital: theatrical depictions of city space in the north
Journal name Australasian Drama Studies
ISSN 0810-4123
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 52
Start page 52
End page 68
Total pages 17
Editor Milne, Geoffrey
Place of publication Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
Publisher La Trobe University, Theatre & Drama Program
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
950105 The Performing Arts (incl. Theatre and Dance)
190402 Creative Writing (incl. Playwriting)
Abstract Carleton explores the notion of Darwin as contemporary Australian frontier capital, and uses theater as the prism through which to understand the ways in which this troping is articulated and performed--reiterated--into the popular national imaginary. Theater is an immediate and powerful outlet of public expression and debate in most times and places, but is much more vitally so in a city as under-represented in the national imaginary as Darwin has traditionally been. Here, He interrogates the complex ways in which Darwin can be seen to operate as a microcosm of locus for these broad national anxieties and will take this argument a step further by asserting that the city's cultural politics actually challenge the dichotomous nature of frontier narratives
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2009, 17:50:18 EST by Vicky McNicol on behalf of School of Communication and Arts