Three non-places of supermodernity in the history of French cinema: 1967, 1985, 2000. Playtime, Subway and Stand-by

Hainge, G. (2008) Three non-places of supermodernity in the history of French cinema: 1967, 1985, 2000. Playtime, Subway and Stand-by. Australian Journal of French Studies, 45 3: 197-211. doi:10.3828/AJFS.45.3.197

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Author Hainge, G.
Title Three non-places of supermodernity in the history of French cinema: 1967, 1985, 2000. Playtime, Subway and Stand-by
Formatted title
Three non-places of supermodernity in the history of French cinema: 1967, 1985, 2000. Playtime, Subway and Stand-by
Journal name Australian Journal of French Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9468
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3828/AJFS.45.3.197
Open Access Status
Volume 45
Issue 3
Start page 197
End page 211
Total pages 15
Editor Hardwick, J.
Nelson, B.
Place of publication Melbourne
Publisher Monash University
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
190201 Cinema Studies
950205 Visual Communication
Abstract The telescoping of time and shrinking of space are both effects of a modernist space that is made possible by the late Nineteenth Century’s new technologies such as the locomotive and the cinema. It is, then, no coincidence that the birth of cinema took place on the platform of a train station at La Ciotat in 1895, for since its inception, the cinema has been drawn to such spaces of modernity precisely because the transformation of human perception (or phenomenological space) that it renders possible is mirrored so closely by the reorganisation of physical space in the post-industrial urban sphere (or physical space). The confluence of the history of the cinema and that of the urban spaces of modernity has been examined at length by critics such as Benjamin and Kracauer; rather than expand upon this history, in this article I will instead examine cinematic representations of three spaces of modernity, each of which is situated at a distinct historical juncture: Jacques Tati’s Playtime (1967), Luc Besson’s Subway (1985) and Roch Stephanik’s Stand by (2000), each of which is produced in periods we might term, respectively (albeit somewhat problematically), the modern, the postmodern and, after Augé, the supermodern. However, what this analysis will make clear is that, in spite of the paradigm shifts that such a taxonomy appears to imply, what changes in these cinematic representations across this period is the relation of these films’ protagonists to the spaces in which they move as opposed to the spaces themselves, which are always, it will be argued, already supermodern or, perhaps, always simply modern.
Keyword French cinema
Grandrieux
Deleuze
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Mar 2009, 15:26:59 EST by Jo Grimmond on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures