Social participation for older people with aphasia: The impact of communication disability on friendships

Davidson, Bronwyn, Howe, Tami, Worrall, Linda and Hickson, Leanne (2008) Social participation for older people with aphasia: The impact of communication disability on friendships. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 15 4: 325-340. doi:10.1310/tsr1504-325

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Author Davidson, Bronwyn
Howe, Tami
Worrall, Linda
Hickson, Leanne
Title Social participation for older people with aphasia: The impact of communication disability on friendships
Journal name Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1074-9357
1945-5119
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1310/tsr1504-325
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 325
End page 340
Total pages 16
Place of publication Birmingham, AL
Publisher Thomas Land Publishers Inc
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The language changes experienced by a person with aphasia following a stroke often have sudden and longlasting negative impact on friendships. Friendship relationships are core to social engagement, quality of life, and emotional well-being. The aims of this study were to describe everyday communication with friends for older people with and without aphasia and to examine the nature of actual friendship conversations involving a person with aphasia.

Method: This naturalistic inquiry drew data from two phases of research: a participant observation study of 30 older Australians, 15 of whom had aphasia following a stroke, and a collective case study using stimulated recall to examine friendship conversations involving an older person with aphasia.

Results: People with aphasia communicated with fewer friends and had smaller social networks. “Friendship” was a core domain of communication for older people and participation in leisure and educational activities was focal in everyday communication with friends. Case study data of conversations between three older people with aphasia and their friends illuminated features of “time,” the role of humour, and friends having shared interests.

Conclusion:
Aphasia has been found to impact on friendships. A need exists for research and intervention programs to address communication with friends for older people with aphasia.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 67 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 23 Mar 2009, 15:23:14 EST by Meredith Downes on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences