Advancing the curriculum for young people who have an intellectual disability: Advocacy in health: A pilot study

Carrington, S. and Lennox, N. G. (2008) Advancing the curriculum for young people who have an intellectual disability: Advocacy in health: A pilot study. Australasian Journal of Special Education, 32 2: 177-186. doi:10.1080/10300110802047228

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Author Carrington, S.
Lennox, N. G.
Title Advancing the curriculum for young people who have an intellectual disability: Advocacy in health: A pilot study
Journal name Australasian Journal of Special Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1030-0112
Publication date 2008-09
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10300110802047228
Volume 32
Issue 2
Start page 177
End page 186
Total pages 10
Editor Jennifer Stephenson
Place of publication Abingdon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject 930302 Syllabus and Curriculum Development
920205 Health Education and Promotion
130312 Special Education and Disability
111712 Health Promotion
C1
Abstract This article reports on the pilot work for a collaborative National Health and Medical Research Council project in Australia involving education and health professionals to improve the health and well-being of young people who have an intellectual disability. The pilot study was a qualitative exploration of teacher experiences using a health diary as part of the special education curriculum over a six-month period. The research questions were: (1) How did teachers include health-related matters in the curriculum before use of the Ask Health Diary?; and (2) How did teachers and students use the Ask Health Diary as a component of the school curriculum and what were the benefits? The Ask Health Diary was used to introduce students to the concept of self-advocacy in relation to their health needs and provide practical strategies for supporting students’ learning about self-advocacy in relation to their health. The reported data indicates that the Ask Health Diary was a popular resource for students and teachers and raised awareness of the importance of developing the communication skills and independent living abilities necessary for young people to advocate for their own health needs. The pilot study indicates that there is merit in including the diary in a health-based school curriculum for adolescents who have an intellectual disability.
Keyword Intellectual disability
Education, Special
Health promotion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 23 Mar 2009, 12:59:44 EST by Dell Hele on behalf of School of Medicine