A pilot study to assess the possible methods of determining the burden of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in primary care

Palmer, E., Wingfield, D., Jamrozik, K. and Partridge, M. (2005) A pilot study to assess the possible methods of determining the burden of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in primary care. Primary Care Respiratory Journal, 14 3: 131-142. doi:10.1016/j.pcrj.2004.12.004


Author Palmer, E.
Wingfield, D.
Jamrozik, K.
Partridge, M.
Title A pilot study to assess the possible methods of determining the burden of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in primary care
Journal name Primary Care Respiratory Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-4418
1475-1534
Publication date 2005-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pcrj.2004.12.004
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 14
Issue 3
Start page 131
End page 142
Total pages 12
Place of publication Lockerbie, United Kingdom
Publisher General Practice Airways Group
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract A significant minority of otherwise healthy adults may suffer from disordered breathing during sleep. The commonest problem, known as Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS), results in poor quality sleep, daytime hypersomnolence and excess risk of road traffic crashes. It is also associated with occupational injuries. OSAS can be successfully treated, reducing costs of hospitalisation. There is a gap in the literature regarding the burden of patients with OSAS in primary care, particularly because there is no agreed method for screening.
Keyword Obstructive sleep apnoea
Screening
Primary care
Epworth
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 02:07:22 EST by Paul Rollo on behalf of School of Public Health