The benefits of participatory methodologies to develop effective community dialogue in the context of a microbicide trial feasibility study in Mwanza, Tanzania

Vallely, Andrew, Shagi, Charles, Kasindi, Stella, Desmond, Nicola, Lees, Shelley, Chiduo, Betty, Hayes, Richard, Allen, Caroline, Ross, David and for the Microbicides Development Program (2007) The benefits of participatory methodologies to develop effective community dialogue in the context of a microbicide trial feasibility study in Mwanza, Tanzania. BMC Public Health, 7 Article # 133: 1-12. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-7-133


Author Vallely, Andrew
Shagi, Charles
Kasindi, Stella
Desmond, Nicola
Lees, Shelley
Chiduo, Betty
Hayes, Richard
Allen, Caroline
Ross, David
for the Microbicides Development Program
Title The benefits of participatory methodologies to develop effective community dialogue in the context of a microbicide trial feasibility study in Mwanza, Tanzania
Journal name BMC Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2458
Publication date 2007-07
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-7-133
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Issue Article # 133
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, England
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Subject C1
920503 Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Background
During a microbicide trial feasibility study among women at high-risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infections in Mwanza, northern Tanzania we used participatory research tools to facilitate open dialogue and partnership between researchers and study participants.

Methods

A community-based sexual and reproductive health service was established in ten city wards. Wards were divided into seventy-eight geographical clusters, representatives at cluster and ward level elected and a city-level Community Advisory Committee (CAC) with representatives from each ward established. Workshops and community meetings at ward and city-level were conducted to explore project-related concerns using tools adapted from participatory learning and action techniques such as listing, scoring, ranking, chapatti diagrams and pair-wise matrices.

Results

Key issues identified included beliefs that blood specimens were being sold for witchcraft purposes; worries about specula not being clean; inadequacy of transport allowances; and delays in reporting laboratory test results to participants. To date, the project has responded by inviting members of the CAC to visit the laboratory to observe how blood and genital specimens are prepared; demonstrated the use of the autoclave to community representatives; raised reimbursement levels; introduced HIV rapid testing in the clinic; and streamlined laboratory reporting procedures.

Conclusion

Participatory techniques were instrumental in promoting meaningful dialogue between the research team, study participants and community representatives in Mwanza, allowing researchers and community representatives to gain a shared understanding of project-related priority areas for intervention.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 16 Mar 2009, 14:55:06 EST by Maryanne Watson on behalf of School of Public Health