Comparison of Physical Activity in Male and Female Children: Does Maturation Matter?

Thompson, Angela M., Baxter-Jones, Adam D. G., Mirwald, Robert L. and Bailey, Donald A. (2003) Comparison of Physical Activity in Male and Female Children: Does Maturation Matter?. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 35 10: 1684-1690. doi:10.1249/01.MSS.0000089244.44914.1F


Author Thompson, Angela M.
Baxter-Jones, Adam D. G.
Mirwald, Robert L.
Bailey, Donald A.
Title Comparison of Physical Activity in Male and Female Children: Does Maturation Matter?
Journal name Medicine and science in sports and exercise   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0195-9131
Publication date 2003-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1249/01.MSS.0000089244.44914.1F
Volume 35
Issue 10
Start page 1684
End page 1690
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, P.A., U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract Purpose: To investigate whether observed differences in physical activity levels in boys and girls are confounded by biological age differences particularly during the circumpubertal years. Methods: T The physical activity questionnaire for children (PAQ-C) was administered biannually or triannually to 138 (70 boys; 68 girls) Canadian children for seven consecutive years from 1991 to 1997. Participants were 9-18 yr of age. Anthropometric measurements were taken biannually and age at peak height velocity (PHV) determined. Biological age was defined as years from PHV. The data were analyzed using t-tests and random effects models. Results: TLevel of physical activity decreased with increasing chronological age in both sexes. When aligned on chronological age bands, boys had statistically significantly higher PAQ-C summary scores than girls from 10 through 16 yr of age (P < 0.05). However, when aligned on biological age, sex differences were not apparent, except at 3 yr before PHV. Random effects models of individual growth patterns confirmed these findings. Conclusion: TPhysical activity decreased with increasing chronological age in boys and girls. There were no sex differences in the longitudinal pattern of physical activity when the confounding effects of biological age were controlled except at 3 yr before PHV. (C)2003The American College of Sports Medicine
Keyword adolescents
gender differences
random effects models
peak height velocity
Activity Questionnaire
Older Children
Adolescence
gender
Time
Sport Sciences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Mar 2009, 15:49:21 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences