Agility or strength training ignificantly reduces fallrRisk in 75 to 85 year old women with low bone mass: A randomized controlled trail

Liu-Ambrose, T., Khan, K. M., Eng, J. J., Lord, S. R. and McKay, H. A. (2003). Agility or strength training ignificantly reduces fallrRisk in 75 to 85 year old women with low bone mass: A randomized controlled trail. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2003, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A, (S358-S358). 2003.

Author Liu-Ambrose, T.
Khan, K. M.
Eng, J. J.
Lord, S. R.
McKay, H. A.
Title of paper Agility or strength training ignificantly reduces fallrRisk in 75 to 85 year old women with low bone mass: A randomized controlled trail
Conference name American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2003
Conference location San Francisco, CA, U.S.A
Conference dates 2003
Proceedings title Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Maryland, MO, U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Publication Year 2003
ISSN 0195-9131
1530-0315
Volume 35
Issue 5 Suppl. 1
Start page S358
End page S358
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
BACKGROUND
Low trauma fractures are a major health care problem. Low trauma fracture risk is largely determined by fall risk and bone health. Exercise can positively influence both of these domains of fracture risk, even in older adults. However, no studies have compared the effects of various types of exercise (i.e., strength training, agility training) on fall risk in women with low bone mass.

PURPOSE

To determine the effects of community-based progressive strength training or agility training on fall risk in older women (75 to 85 years old) with confirmed osteopenia or osteoporosis.

METHODS

104 women (mean age of 79) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: strength training, agility training, or sham exercise group. Randomization was stratified by: total hip areal BMD, balance, and the use of bisphosphonates. Training was 26 weeks in duration and twice weekly for all participants. Outcome measures included Lord's Fall Risk Score (FallScreen), gait speed, and functional mobility. MANOVA with post hoc tests were used to determine differences in change between groups. Alpha was set at ≤ 0.05.

RESULTS

At the end of the 26 weeks, Lord's Fall Risk Score (FallScreen; expressed as z scores) was reduced by 60%, 46%, and 18% in the strength training, agility training, and sham exercise group, respectively. Both strength training and agility training significantly reduced fall risk compared to sham exercise. Both types of training also significantly improved postural balance. However, there were no between-group differences in quadriceps strength and reaction time after 26 weeks, although both strength training and agility training showed a strong tendency towards improving reaction time.

CONCLUSIONS
Both progressive strength training and agility training is safe for older women with low bone mass when adequate resources are available. Both significantly reduced fall risk by improving postural balance. ©2003The American College of Sports Medicine 
Subjects 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Keyword bone
Low trauma fractures
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Tue, 10 Mar 2009, 14:12:15 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences