Expert anticipation in the natural setting: Information pick-up or fast visual-processing?

Farrow, D. and Abernethy, B. (2002). Expert anticipation in the natural setting: Information pick-up or fast visual-processing?. In: Robert C. Eklund and Leon Jeter, Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology. Proceedings of: 2002 NASPSPA Free Communications. NASPSPA 2002 Conference, Hunt Valley, MD, U.S.A., (S53-S53). 6-8 June 2002.


Author Farrow, D.
Abernethy, B.
Title of paper Expert anticipation in the natural setting: Information pick-up or fast visual-processing?
Conference name NASPSPA 2002 Conference
Conference location Hunt Valley, MD, U.S.A.
Conference dates 6-8 June 2002
Convener North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA)
Proceedings title Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology. Proceedings of: 2002 NASPSPA Free Communications
Journal name Journal of Sport
Place of Publication Champaign, IL, U.S.A.
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers
Publication Year 2002
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 0895-2779
1543-2904
0163-433X
Editor Robert C. Eklund
Leon Jeter
Volume 24
Issue Supp.
Start page S53
End page S53
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
There is an extensive body of literature across a variety of sports demonstrating that experts are able to anticipate more effectively than novices, in part due to the pick-up of useful anticipatory information from early events in their opponent’s movement pattern to which novices are not attuned. The purpose of this study was to determine (a) whether expertise differences found in laboratory-based temporal occlusion studies exist in natural settings, and (b) whether expertise differences are due to differences in specific information pick-up or rather to faster, generic visual information processing by experts. Expert and novice tennis players returned tennis serves in situ while their vision was temporally occluded in either a traditional progressive temporal occlusion mode (i.e., more information was revealed in each subsequent occlusion condition) or a moving window approach (i.e., the visual display was only available for a fixed duration of 500 ms with this window shifted to different phases of the service action). Regardless of the method of occlusion, experts were able to utilize precontact information sources whereas novices were reliant on ball flight information. Despite improved ecological validity, the results of this experiment were strikingly similar to previous laboratory-based temporal occlusion research, thereby further validating this body of work. Furthermore, the similarity in results between the two occlusion conditions suggests that the expert advantage is not a function of increased information processing time, but rather the accurate perception and pick-up of specific predictive information.
© 2002 Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.
Subjects 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Published June 2002.

 
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Created: Mon, 09 Mar 2009, 15:54:38 EST by Judy Dingwall on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences