Dendritic cells in allergic disease - innocent bystanders or prime suspects?

Yerkovich, Stephanie T., Rate, Angela and Upham, John W. (2006) Dendritic cells in allergic disease - innocent bystanders or prime suspects?. Allergy & Clinical Immunology International, 18 2: 71-75. doi:10.1027/0838-1925.18.2.71


Author Yerkovich, Stephanie T.
Rate, Angela
Upham, John W.
Title Dendritic cells in allergic disease - innocent bystanders or prime suspects?
Journal name Allergy & Clinical Immunology International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0838-1925
Publication date 2006-03
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1027/0838-1925.18.2.71
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 71
End page 75
Total pages 5
Editor J. Ring
Place of publication Cambridge, MA, United States
Publisher Hogrefe Publishing
Language eng
Subject 110701 Allergy
Abstract Background: Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells that have a critical role in regulating immune responses. It is now widely recognized that DC play an important role in allergic diseases in both the initial sensitization phase and in the maintenance of allergic airway inflammation. Methods/Data base: A review of the literature. Results/Conclusion: DC form a close network within the respiratory mucosa, and are rapidly recruited from the circulation in response to allergen challenge. Studies from animal models have indicated that these DC capture allergens from the airway and subsequently prime a T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)-mediated immune response, with the development of airway inflammation. Increased DC numbers are also present in humans with allergic disease and evidence is increasing to suggest that there are functional differences between DC of allergic and normal individuals. While several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how DC are involved in the dysregulated immune response to seemingly harmless allergens in individuals with allergic disease, the exact pathways involved remain to be elucidated. However, it can be seen that DC are one of the central mediators in allergic disease and it will be important to increase our understanding of their role in the allergic setting to provide future therapies.
Keyword Allergy
Atopy
Dendritic cells
Th2 polarization
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Mar 2009, 10:09:14 EST by Ms Sarada Rao on behalf of School of Medicine