Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences suggests revision of humpback dolphin (Sousa spp.) taxonomy is needed

Frere, Celine H., Hale, Peter T., Porter, Lindsay, Cockcroft, Victor G. and Dalebout, Merel L. (2008) Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences suggests revision of humpback dolphin (Sousa spp.) taxonomy is needed. Marine and Freshwater Research, 59 3: 259-268. doi:10.1071/MF07120


Author Frere, Celine H.
Hale, Peter T.
Porter, Lindsay
Cockcroft, Victor G.
Dalebout, Merel L.
Title Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences suggests revision of humpback dolphin (Sousa spp.) taxonomy is needed
Formatted title
Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences suggests revision of humpback dolphin (Sousa spp.) taxonomy is needed
Journal name Marine and Freshwater Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-1650
Publication date 2008-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MF07120
Volume 59
Issue 3
Start page 259
End page 268
Total pages 10
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic., Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Humpback dolphins (Sousa spp.) have a wide distribution in the tropical Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans and a confused taxonomy. Morphological assessments suggest three species groupings – Sousa teuszii (eastern Atlantic), Sousa plumbea (western Indo-Pacific), and Sousa chinensis (eastern Indo-Pacific) – but most taxonomies recognise only two species – S. chinensis (Indo-Pacific), and S. teuszii (Atlantic). To investigate phylogenetic relationships, mitochondrial DNA control region sequences (338 base pairs) from 72 Sousa representing three populations in the Indo-Pacific (South Africa: S. plumbea, n = 23; China: S. chinensis, n = 19; and Australia: S. chinensis, n = 28), and S. teuszii in the Atlantic (Mauritania, n = 2) were generated. All three Indo-Pacific populations formed robust, monophyletic clades with high bootstrap (BS) and Bayesian posterior probability (BPP) scores. Surprisingly, humpback dolphins from South Africa and China formed a strongly-supported clade with the Atlantic S. teuszii (BS 63%, BPP 0.92) to the exclusion of animals from Australia. Genetic divergence between animals from China and Australia (DA = 8.4% ± 2.47%) was greater than between China and South Africa (DA = 5.1% ± 1.80%). These results strongly suggest that Australian humpback dolphins are not S. chinensis but may represent a distinct species in their own right.
Keyword Australia
Delphininae
Hong Kong
phylogeography
South Africa
speciation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 03 Mar 2009, 17:51:07 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences