Achievement Goal Profiles in School Physical Education: Differences in Self-determination, Sport Ability Beliefs, and Physical Activity

Wang, C.K. John, Chatzisarantis, Nikos L.D., Spray, Christopher M. and Biddle, Stuart J.H. (2002) Achievement Goal Profiles in School Physical Education: Differences in Self-determination, Sport Ability Beliefs, and Physical Activity. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 72 3: 433-445.


Author Wang, C.K. John
Chatzisarantis, Nikos L.D.
Spray, Christopher M.
Biddle, Stuart J.H.
Title Achievement Goal Profiles in School Physical Education: Differences in Self-determination, Sport Ability Beliefs, and Physical Activity
Journal name British Journal of Educational Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-0998
Publication date 2002
Year available 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1348/000709902320634401
Volume 72
Issue 3
Start page 433
End page 445
Total pages 13
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher British Psychological Society
Language eng
Subject 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology
Abstract Background: Physical activity is a major public health issue as trends show inadequate levels of physical activity for health and rising levels of obesity. Understanding motivation for physical activity in youth by assessing their motivational profiles associated with school physical education could inform future interventions. Aims: To investigate goal orientation and perceived competence profiles in young adolescents and to test the nature of differences between clusters on motivational and physical activity measures. Sample: Boys (N = 427) and girls (N = 391), aged 11-14 years, from two comprehensive schools in England. Method: Cross-sectional survey using cluster analysis. Results: Clusters reflecting 'highly', 'moderately', and 'lowly' motivated youth were found. Physical activity, incremental sport ability beliefs, and self-determined motivation were highest in the highly motivated cluster. Girls were under-represented in this cluster. Conclusions: High motivation towards physical activity is characterised by high task and high ego orientation, and high perceived competence. With only 38% of this group being girls, interventions are required to boost motivation for girls based on goal and self-determination approaches
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement Studies Publications
 
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