States emerging from hybrid political orders: Pacific experiences The Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies Occasional Papers Series.

Boege, Volker, Brown, M. Anne, Clements, Kevin P. and Nolan, Anna (2008) States emerging from hybrid political orders: Pacific experiences The Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies Occasional Papers Series.. Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies. The Occasional Papers, x 11: 1-41.

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Author Boege, Volker
Brown, M. Anne
Clements, Kevin P.
Nolan, Anna
Title States emerging from hybrid political orders: Pacific experiences The Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies Occasional Papers Series.
Journal name Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies. The Occasional Papers
ISSN 1833-9603
Publication date 2008-09
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume x
Issue 11
Start page 1
End page 41
Total pages 41
Place of publication Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Publisher The University of Queensland
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
940299 Government and Politics not elsewhere classified
160606 Government and Politics of Asia and the Pacific
16 Studies in Human Society
06 Biological Sciences
1606 Political Science
Abstract This study explores current processes of state formation in the Pacific islands, focusing on Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Bougainville (as an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea), Southern Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea, and East Timor. It challenges the mainstream discourse on fragile states as a framework for analysis of the situation of any of these countries or regions, and argues that it is more appropriate to talk about states emerging from hybrid political orders as a common denominator. Hybrid political orders combine elements of the introduced Western models of governance and elements stemming from local indigenous traditions. In East Timor and the Pacific island countries customary governance, deeply rooted in locality, has significant implications for state capacity and functionality as well as legitimacy. Tonga with its constitutional monarchy is transitioning to more liberal democratic forms of governance. This gradual process is driven by civil society forces that are growing in strength. In the Melanesian cases of Vanuatu, Bougainville and Solomon Islands there is negotiation of the conditions and possibilities of a ‘marriage’ between customary governance and introduced Western forms of governance, based on relatively strong customary spheres and state institutions that struggle with problems of effectiveness and legitimacy. East Timor is engaged in a conventional state-building process (with massive external assistance) focusing on the transfer and strengthening of central government institutions. The process has taken little account of customary institutions and their potential for contributing to governance and order, and has inadvertently marginalised both local culture and rural communities more generally, with considerable negative effects for Timorese state formation. In the Southern Highlands Province of PNG a vacuum of effective and legitimate governance can be found. In all of these countries or regions there is considerable potential for state and non-state actors to play complementary roles in the provision of functions which OECD countries normally assign exclusively to the state. We also found areas of incompatibility and areas of considerable friction between state and customary institutions. These, however, are not due to insurmountable contradictions between customary and liberal democratic principles and could be overcome by processes of mutual adaptation. These findings—large areas of complementarity, at times intense, but surmountable incompatibilities—augur well for constructive interaction between state and customary institutions which might lead to the emergence of networks of resilient governance which are not introduced from the outside, but are embedded in the societal structures on the ground. Keyword(s) state formation
Keyword State formation
Political orders
Social resilience
Fragile states
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Occasional Papers Series - no Volume listed.

 
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Created: Fri, 20 Feb 2009, 12:24:47 EST by Anna Bartos on behalf of Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies