You can't keep a good parasite down: Evolution of a male-killer suppressor uncovers cytoplasmic incompatibility

Hornett, Emily A., Duplouy, Anne M. R., Davies, Neil, Roderick, George K., Wedell, Nina, Hurst, Gregory D. D. and Charlat, Sylvain (2008) You can't keep a good parasite down: Evolution of a male-killer suppressor uncovers cytoplasmic incompatibility. Evolution, 62 5: 1258-1263.


Author Hornett, Emily A.
Duplouy, Anne M. R.
Davies, Neil
Roderick, George K.
Wedell, Nina
Hurst, Gregory D. D.
Charlat, Sylvain
Title You can't keep a good parasite down: Evolution of a male-killer suppressor uncovers cytoplasmic incompatibility
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
Publication date 2008-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00353.x
Volume 62
Issue 5
Start page 1258
End page 1263
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060307 Host-Parasite Interactions
Formatted abstract Maternally inherited parasites are known to impose a wide variety of reproductive manipulations upon their host. These often produce strong selection on the host to suppress the parasite, resulting in a reduction in the frequency of the parasite. However, in the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina, infected with a Wolbachia bacterium, field data demonstrate that suppression of the male-killing phenotype does not depress parasite frequency. Here we test and verify one hypothesis to explain this apparent paradox—Wolbachia induces a second phenotype, Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI), in populations where host suppression has evolved. We further demonstrate that the capacity to induce CI has not evolved de novo, but instead is instantaneously expressed upon the survival of infected males. The significance of these results is threefold: (1) multiple phenotypes can provide Wolbachia with the means to maintain itself in a host following suppression of a single manipulative phenotype; (2) the ability to induce CI can remain hidden in systems in which male-killing is observed, just as the ability to induce male-killing may be obscured in strains exhibiting CI; (3) the evolutionary maintenance of CI in a system in which it is not expressed suggests a functional link with male-killing or other traits under selection
Keyword Hypolimnas bolina
male-killing
suppression
Wolbachia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes Published Online: 21 Feb 2008

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 16 Feb 2009, 16:37:27 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences