The demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: Reconstructing the ancestral metazoan genome and deciphering the origin of animal multicellularity

Degnan, Bernard M., Adamska, Maja, Craigie, Alina, Degnan, Sandie M., Fahey, Bryony, Gauthier, Marie, Hooper, John N. A., Larroux, Claire, Leys, Sally P., Lovas, Erica and Richards, Gemma S. (2008) The demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: Reconstructing the ancestral metazoan genome and deciphering the origin of animal multicellularity. Cold Spring Harbor Protocols, 3 12: 1-6. doi:10.1101/pdb.emo108


Author Degnan, Bernard M.
Adamska, Maja
Craigie, Alina
Degnan, Sandie M.
Fahey, Bryony
Gauthier, Marie
Hooper, John N. A.
Larroux, Claire
Leys, Sally P.
Lovas, Erica
Richards, Gemma S.
Title The demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: Reconstructing the ancestral metazoan genome and deciphering the origin of animal multicellularity
Formatted title
The demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: Reconstructing the ancestral metazoan genome and deciphering the origin of animal multicellularity
Journal name Cold Spring Harbor Protocols   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1559-6095
1940-3402
Publication date 2008-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1101/pdb.emo108
Open Access Status
Volume 3
Issue 12
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Place of publication Woodbury, NY, United States
Publisher Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060408 Genomics
Formatted abstract
Sponges are one of the earliest branching metazoans. In addition to undergoing complex development and differentiation, they can regenerate via stem cells and can discern self from nonself ("allorecognition"), making them a useful comparative model for a range of metazoan-specific processes. Molecular analyses of these processes have the potential to reveal ancient homologies shared among all living animals and critical genomic innovations that underpin metazoan multicellularity. Amphimedon queenslandica (Porifera, Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Niphatidae) is the first poriferan representative to have its genome sequenced, assembled, and annotated. Amphimedon exemplifies many sessile and sedentary marine invertebrates (e.g., corals, ascidians, bryozoans): They disperse during a planktonic larval phase, settle in the vicinity of conspecifics, ward off potential competitors (including incompatible genotypes), and ensure that brooded eggs are fertilized by conspecific sperm. Using genomic and expressed sequence tag (EST) resources from Amphimedon, functional genomic approaches can be applied to a wide range of ecological and population genetic processes, including fertilization, dispersal, and colonization dynamics, host-symbiont interactions, and secondary metabolite production. Unlike most other sponges, Amphimedon produce hundreds of asynchronously developing embryos and larvae year-round in distinct, easily accessible brood chambers. Embryogenesis gives rise to larvae with at least a dozen cell types that are segregated into three layers and patterned along the body axis. In this article, we describe some of the methods currently available for studying A. queenslandica, focusing on the analysis of embryos, larvae, and post-larvae.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 13 Feb 2009, 17:53:51 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences