The poor performance of NaOH in the dissolution of whey protein gels at very high pH

Mercade-Prieto, R. M., Chen, X. D., Falconer, R. J., Paterson, W. R. and Wilson, D. I. (2005). The poor performance of NaOH in the dissolution of whey protein gels at very high pH. In: Hans Müller-Steinhagen, M. Reza Malayeri and A. Paul Watkinson, Proceedings of 6th International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning - Challenges and Opportunities. 6th International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning - Challenges and Opportunities, Kloster Irsee, Germany, (158-164). 5 - 10 June 2005.


Author Mercade-Prieto, R. M.
Chen, X. D.
Falconer, R. J.
Paterson, W. R.
Wilson, D. I.
Title of paper The poor performance of NaOH in the dissolution of whey protein gels at very high pH
Conference name 6th International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning - Challenges and Opportunities
Conference location Kloster Irsee, Germany
Conference dates 5 - 10 June 2005
Proceedings title Proceedings of 6th International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning - Challenges and Opportunities
Place of Publication Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
Publisher The Berkeley Electronic Press
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor Hans Müller-Steinhagen
M. Reza Malayeri
A. Paul Watkinson
Start page 158
End page 164
Total pages 7
Language eng
Abstract/Summary It is reported in the literature that when cleaning whey protein concentrate fouling layers or gels with highly concentrated NaOH solutions the cleaning rate is very low. This phenomenon is particularly evident at pH values above 13.5 and at temperatures below 50°C. Experiments have been performed on whey gels at the Universities of Auckland and Cambridge to elucidate the mechanisms involved in those conditions, as well as for lower pH values. The results suggest that at pH < 13, the dissolution rate is controlled by the β-elimination of the intermolecular disulfide bonds present in the WPC gels. At pH > 13, the NaOH in the gel is suggested to induce new intermolecular crosslinks that make the gels more alkali-resistant. Dissolution experiments with caustic-induced gels show that the presence of NaOH in whey gels can greatly enhance their resistance to alkali.
Subjects 100302 Bioprocessing, Bioproduction and Bioproducts
1003 Industrial Biotechnology
Q-Index Code E1
Additional Notes ECI Symposium Series, Volume RP2, Article 24

 
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Created: Wed, 11 Feb 2009, 12:19:35 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology