Cyanobacterial poisoning in livestock, wild mammals and birds - an overview.

Stewart, I., Seawright, A. A. and Shaw, G. R. (2008). Cyanobacterial poisoning in livestock, wild mammals and birds - an overview.. In H. Kenneth Hudnell (Ed.), Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms: State of the Science and Research Needs (pp. 613-637) New York USA: Springer Science and Business Media, LLC.


Author Stewart, I.
Seawright, A. A.
Shaw, G. R.
Title of chapter Cyanobacterial poisoning in livestock, wild mammals and birds - an overview.
Title of book Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms: State of the Science and Research Needs
Place of Publication New York USA
Publisher Springer Science and Business Media, LLC
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-0-387-75865-7
Year available 2008
Series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
ISBN 978-0-387-75864-0
Editor H. Kenneth Hudnell
Volume number 619
Chapter number 28
Start page 613
End page 637
Total pages 25
Total chapters 39
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subjects B1
070205 Animal Protection (Pests and Pathogens)
070704 Veterinary Epidemiology
961006 Natural Hazards in Marine Environments
960406 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Environments
Abstract/Summary Poisoning of livestock by toxic cyanobacteria was first reported in the 19th century, and throughout the 20th century cyanobacteria–related poisonings of livestock and wildlife in all continents have been described. Some mass mortality events involving unrelated fauna in prehistoric times have also been attributed to cyanotoxin poisoning; if correct, this serves as a reminder that toxic cyanobacteria blooms predate anthropogenic manipulation of the environment, though there is probably general agreement that human intervention has led to increases in the frequency and extent of cyanobacteria blooms. Many of the early reports of cyanobacteria poisoning were anecdotal and circumstantial, albeit with good descriptions of the appearance and behaviour of cyanobacteria blooms that preceded or coincided with illness and death in exposed animals. Early necropsy findings of hepatotoxicity were subsequently confirmed by experimental investigations. More recent reports supplement clinical and post–mortem findings with investigative chemistry techniques to identify cyanotoxins in stomach contents and tissue fluids.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 10 Feb 2009, 13:40:32 EST by Marie-Louise Moore on behalf of National Res Centre For Environmental Toxicology