Tenancy databases, professional practices and housing access among low-income tenants in the private rental sector in Australia

Short, Patricia, Minnery, John, Mead, Elspeth, O'Flaherty, Martin and Peake, Andrew (2006) Tenancy databases, professional practices and housing access among low-income tenants in the private rental sector in Australia. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 30 4: 930-943. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2427.2006.00701.x

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Author Short, Patricia
Minnery, John
Mead, Elspeth
O'Flaherty, Martin
Peake, Andrew
Title Tenancy databases, professional practices and housing access among low-income tenants in the private rental sector in Australia
Journal name International Journal of Urban and Regional Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0309-1317
1468-2427
Publication date 2006-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2006.00701.x
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 930
End page 943
Total pages 14
Editor Jeremy Seekings
Roger Keil
Terry McBride
Place of publication New York, United States of America
Publisher Columbia University
Language eng
Subject 160512 Social Policy
120503 Housing Markets, Development, Management
Abstract This essay addresses the impacts of electronic tenancy databases upon social relations in the field of private rental tenancy in Australia. Insights arise from research carried out, in 2002–3, in the eastern, mainland states of Australia that included interviews with tenants and property managers in the private rental sector. Property managers viewed tenancy databases as a tool for efficient, effective and professional risk management, and ‘professional’ practice was held to render misconduct or improper listings extremely unlikely. In this context, tenants were individualized and expected to actively work to construct, maintain and document their reputation as a ‘good tenant’. For tenants, tenancy databases could have a particular, definitive effect. ‘Not being listed’ (along with getting a full rental bond refund, references from previous landlords, and so on) is an indicator that helps build a satisfactory, personal rental history. On the other hand, being ‘listed’ is read as a prime indicator of risk and effectively overriding other aspects of a tenant’s application for tenancy. ‘Listed’ tenants find themselves being forced to shift further and further away from the formal rental market and ultimately into insecure and inappropriate housing arrangements at the periphery.
Keyword Electronic tenancy databases
Social relations
Private rental tenancy
Australian private rental market
Tenancy risk
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Feb 2009, 17:58:50 EST by Joanne Mellor on behalf of Geographical Sciences & Planning