Artificial gravity reveals activity-dependent coupling in sensorimotor coordination

Carson, R. G., Oytam, Y. and Riek, S. (2006). Artificial gravity reveals activity-dependent coupling in sensorimotor coordination. In: , Society for Neuroscience, October 2006. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 32, Georgia World Congress Center: Halls B3-B5, (1-1). 14-18 October 2006.


Author Carson, R. G.
Oytam, Y.
Riek, S.
Title of paper Artificial gravity reveals activity-dependent coupling in sensorimotor coordination
Conference name Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 32
Conference location Georgia World Congress Center: Halls B3-B5
Conference dates 14-18 October 2006
Proceedings title Society for Neuroscience, October 2006
Place of Publication Washington, D.S.
Publisher Society for Neuroscience (SfN)
Publication Year 2006
Volume Program No: 558.8/DD25
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary In Experiment 1, eight participants generated flexion and extension movements of the wrist, in time with an auditory metronome that increased in frequency from 1.50 to 3.50 Hz (over 54 s). In separate blocks, the forearm was either prone or supine. An inverse control scheme was implemented via a torque motor system to compensate completely for the dynamics of the moving limb. It was thus possible, in separate trial blocks, to impose motion-torque dynamics that were the reverse of the original gravitational torque, or restored the original gravitational torque. On alternate trials, the participants were asked to generate flex-on-the-beat (fob), or extend-on-the-beat (eob), patterns of coordination. The principal dependent measure was the frequency at which the target pattern could no longer be maintained. When the forearm was prone, and gravity normal the fob pattern was more stable than the eob pattern. In contrast, when gravity was reversed, eob was sustained at higher frequencies than fob. When the forearm was supine, and gravity normal, eob was more stable than fob. Whereas, when gravity was reversed fob was more stable than eob.

In experiment 2, eight participants performed rhythmic plantar-/dorsi-flexion movements of the foot. In separate blocks of trials, the gravitational torque acting on the moving limb segment was either normal or reversed. In each trial the frequency of a pacing metronome was increased from 1.50 to 3.25 Hz. On alternate trials, the participants were asked to generate plantar-flex-on-the-beat (pob), or dorsi-flex-on-the-beat (dob), patterns of coordination. When gravity was normal, the pob pattern was sustained at higher frequencies than dob. In contrast, when gravity was reversed, dob was more stable than pob. These results support the view that the level of efferent drive required to generate the accentuated phase of the movement cycle dictated the stability of sensori-motor coordination.
Subjects 110603 Motor Control
Keyword Motor
Neuroscience
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Presentation Start/End Time:Tuesday, Oct 17, 2006, 11:00 AM -12:00 PM

 
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Created: Thu, 29 Jan 2009, 13:57:32 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of School of Human Movement Studies