Evaluating the effectiveness of psychological preparedness advice in community cyclone preparedness materials

Morrissey, Shirley and Reser, Joseph (2003) Evaluating the effectiveness of psychological preparedness advice in community cyclone preparedness materials. Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 18 2: 46-61.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ162055_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 298.89KB 1
Author Morrissey, Shirley
Reser, Joseph
Title Evaluating the effectiveness of psychological preparedness advice in community cyclone preparedness materials
Journal name Australian Journal of Emergency Management
ISSN 1324-1540
Publication date 2003-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 46
End page 61
Total pages 16
Place of publication Mt. Macedon, Australia
Publisher Australian Emergency Management Institute
Language eng
Subject 1701 Psychology
Abstract This paper addresses the case of tropical cyclone warnings in Northern Australia and briefly outlines the nature, logic, and findings of a psychological preparedness intervention trailed in Cairns, Queensland, during the 1996/1997cyclone season. The aim of the research was to trial, evaluate and refine an innovative natural disaster public education and warning communication intervention focusing on tropical cyclone preparedness and response. This risk communication intervention involved the dissemination of selected psychological information designed to enable individuals to better cope with themselves and others in an increasingly threatening situation. The psycho-educational content material incorporated was derived from ‘Stress Inoculation Theory’ (Meichenbaum, 1985; 1994; Meichenbaum and Deffenbacher, 1988). The research found that the pre-cyclone season period is a critically important time and venue for prevention and mitigation, and that psychological factors and processes during this threat period are of singular importance to effective coping and adaptive responding. The research also clearly indicated that there are a substantial number of residents in cyclone-prone communities for whom chronic anxiety, avoidant coping styles, and prior traumatic experience constitute both a substantial vulnerability factor and a genuine impediment to psychological and physical preparedness.
Keyword Tropical cyclone warnings
Cyclone preparedness and response.
Stress Inoculation Theory
Natural disaster public education
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Architecture Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 28 Jan 2009, 17:53:06 EST by Sophie Jordan on behalf of Faculty Of Engineering, Architecture & Info Tech