Too many surveys! Eliciting the views of general practitioners for not participating in postal surveys

Khan, Asaduzzaman, Hussain, Rafat, Plummer, David C. and Minichiello, Victor (2004) Too many surveys! Eliciting the views of general practitioners for not participating in postal surveys. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 10 2: 76-81.


Author Khan, Asaduzzaman
Hussain, Rafat
Plummer, David C.
Minichiello, Victor
Title Too many surveys! Eliciting the views of general practitioners for not participating in postal surveys
Journal name Australian Journal of Primary Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1448-7527
1324-2296
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Volume 10
Issue 2
Start page 76
End page 81
Total pages 6
Place of publication Bundoora, Vic
Publisher Australian Journal of Primary Health, Australian Institute for Primary Care and School of Public Health, La Trobe University
Language eng
Subject 0104 Statistics
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract This study explored the reasons general practitioners (GPs) are reluctant to partitipate in a postal suroey. A cross-sectionalpostal suroey was conducted among currentlypractising GPs in New South Wales, Australia, in 2002, who were asked to complete a questionnaire on the management ofsexually transmitted infections (S17s). Ibe overall response rate for the main S17 suroey was 45.4%. Ibe GPs who did not respond to the S17 questionnaire were sent a onepage non-response questionnaire asking them to report their reasons for not partiCipating in the S17 SUlVey. Of the 491 non-responding GPs, 116 (23.6%) completed the non-response questionnaire andform the basis ofthe present paper. Ibe key reasons reported by GPsfor not participating in postal suroeys were acute time constraints imposed by increasing workload including substantially increased paperwork, receiving too many suroey requests, low S17 caseload, and few incentives or returns on their time spent on completing suroeys. While researchers need to be cognisant ofconstraints in generalpractice, it is also important to develop strategiesfor increasing GP involvement in research activities. To help improveparticipation of GPs in postal surveys, we recommend involvement ofGPs in the design and conduct ofresearch on issues relevant to general practice along with provision offeedback ofsurvey results.
Keyword Medical practitioners
Surveys
Research
Postal survey,
General practitioners
Non-response
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 27 Jan 2009, 13:42:13 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences