Dermatoscopic Follow-up of a Changing Pigmented Melanocytic Skin Lesion During Pregnancy: From Nevus to Melanoma (Letter to the Editor)

Zalaudek, Iris, Wolf, Ingrid H., Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer, Leinweber, Bernd, Di Stefani, Alessandro, Argenziano, Giuseppe, Soyer, H. Peter and Kerl, Helmut (2004) Dermatoscopic Follow-up of a Changing Pigmented Melanocytic Skin Lesion During Pregnancy: From Nevus to Melanoma (Letter to the Editor). Melanoma Research, 14 4: 323-325. doi:10.1097/01.cmr.0000138826.11538.5e


Author Zalaudek, Iris
Wolf, Ingrid H.
Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer
Leinweber, Bernd
Di Stefani, Alessandro
Argenziano, Giuseppe
Soyer, H. Peter
Kerl, Helmut
Title Dermatoscopic Follow-up of a Changing Pigmented Melanocytic Skin Lesion During Pregnancy: From Nevus to Melanoma (Letter to the Editor)
Journal name Melanoma Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0960-8931
1473-5636
Publication date 2004-08
Year available 2004
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1097/01.cmr.0000138826.11538.5e
Volume 14
Issue 4
Start page 323
End page 325
Total pages 3
Editor F. J. Lejeune
W. J. Storkus
Place of publication London
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 110304 Dermatology
Formatted abstract
Introduction:
Multiple dysplastic melanocytic nevi (DMN) represent generally accepted risk factors for melanoma. Although most melanomas are considered to grow de novo, an uncertain proportion of DMN may transform into melanoma, often characterized by a history of change. However, DMN may also show physiological changes as reported to occur during pregnancy, such as enlargement or change in color. Although neither hormones nor the pregnancy per se appear to influence the development and/or the prognosis of melanoma, close surveillance of pregnant females, particularly when displaying multiple DMN, is recommended.

The introduction of dermatoscopy into clinical practice has been demonstrated to improve the early diagnosis of melanoma compared with the naked eye. In addition, digital dermatoscopy is a useful tool for the follow-up examination of individuals bearing multiple DMN, since it allows the surveillance and recognition of morphologic changes suspicious for melanoma over time. However, to date little is known about the dermatoscopic changes seen in DMN during pregnancy.

We report for the first time on the changing dermoscopic pattern observed during digital dermatoscopic follow-up of a melanocytic skin lesion located on the leg of a 41-year-old pregnant female (skin type I) with multiple DMN. Clinically, the lesion revealed an 8.0 mm×9.0 mm in diameter, ill-defined light-brown macule. On dermatoscopic examination, a homogenous brown pigmentation with an eccentric hypo-pigmentation, and a few irregularly distributed brown globules at the periphery were seen (Fig. 1). Due to the asymmetry of the structures, differential diagnosis to dysplastic melanocytic nevus and melanoma was considered and surgical excision of the lesion was recommended. However, the patient, herself a medical doctor, was informed about the suspected diagnosis but refused excision as she was pregnant at that time. Thus, digital dermatoscopy was performed and a follow-up evaluation was performed 4 weeks later, showing no evidence of morphologic changes. The patient was advised to have further close follow-up.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 Jan 2009, 15:06:18 EST by Marianne Steentsma on behalf of School of Medicine