Babies sleeping with parents: case-control study of factors influencing the risk of the sudden infant death syndrome

Blair, Peter S., Fleming, Peter J., Smith, Iain J., Platt, Martin Ward, Young, Jeanine, Nadin, Pam, Berry, P. J. and Golding, Jean (1999) Babies sleeping with parents: case-control study of factors influencing the risk of the sudden infant death syndrome. British Medical Journal, 319 7223: 1457-1461. doi:10.1136/bmj.319.7223.1457


Author Blair, Peter S.
Fleming, Peter J.
Smith, Iain J.
Platt, Martin Ward
Young, Jeanine
Nadin, Pam
Berry, P. J.
Golding, Jean
Title Babies sleeping with parents: case-control study of factors influencing the risk of the sudden infant death syndrome
Journal name British Medical Journal
ISSN 0007-1447
Publication date 1999-12-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.319.7223.1457
Volume 319
Issue 7223
Start page 1457
End page 1461
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Language eng
Subject 1110 Nursing
111006 Midwifery
Formatted abstract Objective
To investigate the risks of the sudden infant death syndrome and factors that may contribute to unsafe sleeping environments.

Design
Three year, population based case-control study. Parental interviews were conducted for each sudden infant death and for four controls matched for age, locality, and time of sleep.

Setting

Five regions in England with a total population of over 17 million people. Subjects 325 babies who died and 1300 control infants.

Results
In the multivariate analysis infants who shared their parents' bed and were then put back in their own cot had no increased risk (odds ratio 0.67; 95% confidence interval 0.22 to 2.00). There was an increased risk for infants who shared the bed for the whole sleep or were taken to and found in the parental bed (9.78; 4.02 to 23.83), infants who slept in a separate room from their parents (10.49; 4.26 to 25.81), and infants who shared a sofa (48.99; 5.04 to 475.60). The risk associated with being found in the parental bed was not significant for older infants (>14 weeks) or for infants of parents who did not smoke and became non-significant after adjustment for recent maternal alcohol consumption (>2 units), use of duvets (>4 togs), parental tiredness (infant slept [less-than-or-eq, slant]4 hours for longest sleep in previous 24 hours), and overcrowded housing conditions (>2 people per room of the house).

Conclusions

There are certain circumstances when bed sharing should be avoided, particularly for infants under four months old. Parents sleeping on a sofa with infants should always be avoided. There is no evidence that bed sharing is hazardous for infants of parents who do not smoke. Key messsages * Cosleeping with an infant on a sofa was associated with a particularly high risk of sudden infant death syndrome * Sharing a room with the parents was associated with a lower risk * There was no increased risk associated with bed sharing when the infant was placed back in his or her cot * Among parents who do not smoke or infants older than 14 weeks there was no association between infants being found in the parental bed and an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome * The risk linked with bed sharing among younger infants seems to be associated with recent parental consumption of alcohol, overcrowded housing conditions, extreme parental tiredness, and the infant being under a duvet
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes This is published as a paper as oppossed to an article - listed seperately in journal issue

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Jan 2009, 12:50:57 EST by Judy Dingwall on behalf of School of Nursing and Midwifery