Effect of sheep mastication and digestion on the transmission and viability of small-flowered mallow (Malva parviflora L.) seeds

Michael, Pippa J., Vercoe, Philip E., Steadman, Kathryn J. and Plummer, Julie A. (2004). Effect of sheep mastication and digestion on the transmission and viability of small-flowered mallow (Malva parviflora L.) seeds. In: 14th Australian Weeds Conference Proceedings: weed management - balancing people, planet, profit. 13th Australian Weeds Conference, Charles Sturt Universlity, Wagga Wagga, nsw, (516-518). 6-10 September 2004.


Author Michael, Pippa J.
Vercoe, Philip E.
Steadman, Kathryn J.
Plummer, Julie A.
Title of paper Effect of sheep mastication and digestion on the transmission and viability of small-flowered mallow (Malva parviflora L.) seeds
Conference name 13th Australian Weeds Conference
Conference location Charles Sturt Universlity, Wagga Wagga, nsw
Conference dates 6-10 September 2004
Proceedings title 14th Australian Weeds Conference Proceedings: weed management - balancing people, planet, profit
Place of Publication NSW
Publisher Weed Society of NSW Inc
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 0975248804
9780975248805
Start page 516
End page 518
Total pages 3
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Malva parviflora is increasingly becoming a problem in Australian farming systems, both in cropping and livestock production. There may be a potential to utilize livestock for the control of M. parviflora in Australia, however, there is no knowledge of the digestion and transmission of seeds by sheep. Two experiments were carried out, the first investigating the effects of rumen digestion on M. parviflora viability and the second investigating mastication and digestion effects on the transmission and germinability of the seed. Results showed that soft seed, which was able to imbibe water, was totally destroyed as a result of rumen digestion. However, the seed coat of the hard non-imbibing seed enabled it to survive rumen digestion with no apparent loss of viability. The passage of seed followed a normal trend with a peak at 36 h after digestion. Little seed was excreted prior to 12 h or after 120 h following consumption. There may be a potential to manage the weed using livestock as long as the seed coat is soft and able to imbibe water. However, if the seed coat is fully developed and able to prevent imbibition, livestock may act as a vector to spread the weed around the farming system.
Subjects 070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
0703 Crop and Pasture Production
Keyword Malva parviflora
Sheep
Mallow
Seed
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Fri, 09 Jan 2009, 15:51:16 EST by Paul Rollo on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences