The impact and acceptability of information seminars a part of a population approach to parenting behaviour.

Ralph, A., Prior, J., Thompson, R. and Sanders, M. R. (2006). The impact and acceptability of information seminars a part of a population approach to parenting behaviour.. In: 17th International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions Congress, Melbourne, Australia, (). 10-14 September, 2006.

Author Ralph, A.
Prior, J.
Thompson, R.
Sanders, M. R.
Title of paper The impact and acceptability of information seminars a part of a population approach to parenting behaviour.
Conference name 17th International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions Congress
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 10-14 September, 2006
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Oral presentation
Open Access Status
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Community seminars on parenting are a cost efficient way of communicating messages about positive parenting strategies to large numbers of parents. A study into the effectiveness of the Triple P Seminar series was conducted. A randomised controlled trial compared three intervention conditions: Condition 1 (Introductory seminar only, N=34) vs Condition 2 (Full 3-seminar attendance, N=34) vs Condition 3 (Waitlist control, N=41) on a number of parenting and child variables. Results indicated that parents with both introductory and full seminar attendance reported significantly lower levels of inattention/hyperactivity and total emotional and behavioural difficulties in their children, lower levels of over-reactivity and total dysfunctional parenting at post intervention compared to waitlist controls. In addition, parents with full seminar attendance reported significantly lower levels of total anxiety in their children, lower levels of inappropriate parenting practices such as laxness and verbosity, and lower levels of parental conflict at post intervention than did parents with introductory seminar only attendance or waitlist controls. A consumer satisfaction survey indicated that the majority of parents were very satisfied with the quality and content of the seminar presentations, and the overwhelming majority of parents attending the seminars indicated that they intended to implement the parenting advice received. Follow-up data will also be reported, and the implications of providing parenting information in this format will be discussed.
Subjects 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Tue, 16 Dec 2008, 09:33:15 EST by Miss Rachel Thompson on behalf of School of Psychology